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I need to regularly step through a large collection of objects and maintain the unique values of a particular String property within.

I'm using a Hashset to hold the unique values, but was wondering if it's more efficient to check if a value exists in the Hashset, or just attempt to add all the values?

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3 Answers 3

Your test is a bad test for the reasons that Jon Hanna stated and did not give you accurate results. When you call Add internally HashSet calls AddIfNotPresent and the first thing AddIfNotPresent does is check if the object exists (code gotten from ILSpy)

public bool Add(T item)
{
    return this.AddIfNotPresent(item);
}

private bool AddIfNotPresent(T value)
{
    if (this.m_buckets == null)
    {
        this.Initialize(0);
    }
    int num = this.InternalGetHashCode(value);
    int num2 = num % this.m_buckets.Length;
    int num3 = 0;
    for (int i = this.m_buckets[num % this.m_buckets.Length] - 1; i >= 0; i = this.m_slots[i].next)
    {
        if (this.m_slots[i].hashCode == num && this.m_comparer.Equals(this.m_slots[i].value, value))
        {
            return false;
        }
        num3++;
    }
    //(Snip)

So by doing Contains then Add you do a check to see if the object exists twice. If you have many items in the bucket it is checking this could add up to a significant performance loss.

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Yes, my second attempt agrees with your explanation, with the inference that Add() takes about 107% of the time of a call to Contains(). –  TomDestry Dec 11 '13 at 3:25

As my original answer was generally derided, I've had another go.

Int32 maxUniques = 1;
Int32 collectionSize = 100000000;
Random rand = new Random();

while (maxUniques <= collectionSize)
{
    List<Int32> bigCollection = new List<Int32>();
    bigCollection.Capacity = collectionSize;

    for (Int32 count = 0; count < collectionSize; count++)
        bigCollection.Add(rand.Next(maxUniques));

    HashSet<Int32> uniqueSources = new HashSet<Int32>();

    Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
    watch.Start();

    foreach (Int32 num in bigCollection)
    {
        if (!uniqueSources.Contains(num))
            uniqueSources.Add(num);
    }

    Console.WriteLine(String.Format("With {0,10:N0} unique values in a set of {1,10:N0} values, the time taken for conditional add: {2,6:N0} ms", uniqueSources.Count, collectionSize, watch.ElapsedMilliseconds));

    uniqueSources = new HashSet<Int32>();
    watch.Restart();

    foreach (Int32 num in bigCollection)
    {
        uniqueSources.Add(num);
    }

    Console.WriteLine(String.Format("With {0,10:N0} unique values in a set of {1,10:N0} values, the time taken for simple add:      {2,6:N0} ms", uniqueSources.Count, collectionSize, watch.ElapsedMilliseconds));
    Console.WriteLine();

    maxUniques *= 10;
}

Which gave the following output:

With 1 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for conditional add: 2,004 ms With 1 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for simple add: 2,540 ms

With 10 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for conditional add: 2,066 ms With 10 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for simple add: 2,391 ms

With 100 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for conditional add: 2,057 ms With 100 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for simple add: 2,410 ms

With 1,000 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for conditional add: 2,011 ms With 1,000 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for simple add: 2,459 ms

With 10,000 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for conditional add: 2,219 ms
With 10,000 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for simple add: 2,414 ms

With 100,000 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for conditional add: 3,024 ms
With 100,000 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for simple add: 3,124 ms

With 1,000,000 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for conditional add: 8,937 ms
With 1,000,000 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for simple add: 9,310 ms

With 9,999,536 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for conditional add: 11,798 ms
With 9,999,536 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for simple add: 11,660 ms

With 63,199,938 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for conditional add: 20,847 ms
With 63,199,938 unique values in a set of 100,000,000 values, the time taken for simple add: 20,213 ms

Which is curious to me.

Up to 1% additions, it is faster to call the Contains() method rather than just keep hitting the Add(). For 10% and 63%, it was faster to just Add().

To put it another way:
100 million Contains() is faster than 99 million Add()
100 million Contains() is slower than 90 million Add()

I adjusted the code to try 1 million to 10 million unique values in 1 million increments and discovered the inflection point is somewhere around 7-10%, the results weren't conclusive.

So if you're expecting less than 7% of values to be added, it's faster to call Contains() first. More than 7%, just call Add().

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Do the ratios stay the same if you call SimpleAdd first? –  Gabe Dec 11 '13 at 3:31
    
Yes, I tried that check and got equivalent results. –  TomDestry Dec 11 '13 at 3:53
    
I ran through it myself and I was surprised, I got the same results as you even if I did release mode without a debugger, same for switching the order of the tests. However I would not trust 7% as a hard and fast number, the quality and speed of the GetHashCode function that T in HashSet<T> uses will greatly affect the point at which it turns over. Also to rephrase that 7%, it is faster to call Contains when 93% of all items you attempt to instert already exist in the collection; I am having trouble thinking of many non contrived examples where I would have that high of a duplication rate. –  Scott Chamberlain Dec 11 '13 at 7:27

As I was typing the question it occurred that someone would ask why I did't just test it myself. So I've tested it myself.

I created a collection with a 1.26 million records and 21 unique source strings and ran it through the following code:

HashSet<String> uniqueSources = new HashSet<String>();

Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
watch.Start();

foreach (LoggingMessage mess in bigCollection)
{
    uniqueSources.Add(mess.Source);
}

Console.WriteLine(String.Format("Time taken for simple add: {0}ms", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds));

uniqueSources.Clear();
watch.Restart();

foreach (LoggingMessage mess in bigCollection)
{
    if (!uniqueSources.Contains(mess.Source))
        uniqueSources.Add(mess.Source);
}

Console.WriteLine(String.Format("Time taken for conditional add: {0}ms", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds));

With the results that:

Time taken for simple add: 147ms

Time taken for conditional add: 125ms

So for my data at least, checking for existence doesn't slow things down, it is actually slightly faster. The difference it pretty small either way, though.

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2  
That's not really a good test. 1. You haven't tried enough items, since 147ms is not enough to hide noise, the cost of jitting HashSet<string>.Add for the first time, and so on. 2. You're calling Clear() which will empty the set, but leave the internal table larger than on first creation, so it won't have to grow, which is one of the biggest costs to .Add. –  Jon Hanna Dec 10 '13 at 23:18
    
You'd also want to run tests across a range of hit/miss ratios, as what works best at 1% new additions could be very difference to 100% new additions. –  Jon Hanna Dec 10 '13 at 23:21

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