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Is it possible to include the day suffix when formatting a date using DateTime.ToString()?

For example I would like to print the date in the following format - Monday 27th July 2009. However the closest example I can find using DateTime.ToString() is Monday 27 July 2009.

Can I do this with DateTime.ToString() or am I going to have to fall back to my own code?

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3  
Did someone say NodaTime? –  grenade Jan 12 '10 at 17:18
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12 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

As a reference I always use/refer to SteveX String Formatting and there doesn't appear to be any "th" in any of the available variables but you could easily build a string with

string.Format("{0:dddd dd}{1} {0:MMMM yyyy}", DateTime.Now, (?));

You would then have to supply a "st" for 1, "nd" for 2, "rd" for 3, and "th" for all others and could be in-lined with a "? :" statement.

(DateTime.Now.Day == 1)
                    ? "st"
                    : (DateTime.Now.Day == 2)
                          ? "nd"
                          : (DateTime.Now.Day == 3)
                                ? "rd"
                                : "th"
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16  
This would need to be further expanded to cover the other cases, otherwise you'll end up with "21th", for example. –  PirateKitten Jul 27 '11 at 11:37
2  
This should solve your problem perfectly now –  Krishna Thota Oct 3 '12 at 5:31
    
+1 for the link to string formatting patterns –  Liam Oct 31 '12 at 11:09
    
For what it's worth, Microsoft's official documentation of string formatting options can be found here. –  Bobson Nov 14 '12 at 21:38
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Another option using switch:

string GetDaySuffix(int day)
{
    switch (day)
    {
        case 1:
        case 21:
        case 31:
            return "st";
        case 2:
        case 22:
            return "nd";
        case 3:
        case 23:
            return "rd";
        default:
            return "th";
    }
}
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6  
+1 Simple, easy to read, and most importantly, works for all cases. –  Lynn Crumbling Apr 21 '13 at 22:13
17  
@Lazlow In case you are wondering about the sudden activity: your answer was linked as an "how to do it right" example by The Daily WTF. –  tobias_k Oct 28 '13 at 14:01
    
@tobias_k thanks - I wondered how my minuscule reputation had doubled so quickly! –  Lazlow Nov 1 '13 at 9:39
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Another option is using the Modulo Operator:

public string CreateDateSuffix(DateTime date)
{
    // Get day...
    var day = date.Day;

    // Get day modulo...
    var dayModulo = day%10;

    // Convert day to string...
    var suffix = day.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);

    // Combine day with correct suffix...
    suffix += (day == 11 || day == 12 || day == 13) ? "th" :
        (dayModulo == 1) ? "st" :
        (dayModulo == 2) ? "nd" :
        (dayModulo == 3) ? "rd" :
        "th";

    // Return result...
    return suffix;
}
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1  
The eightth is wrong... –  Greg Oct 28 '13 at 21:55
1  
@Greg That's strange as var suffix = CreateDateSuffix(new DateTime(2013, 10, 8)); returns '8th' in my case? –  Anthony Walsh Oct 31 '13 at 1:40
    
If it were appending 'th' to the string 'eight' it would be wrong, but in this case since you used the digit 8 it is correct. –  Greg Nov 3 '13 at 23:04
    
The above method as it stands takes a DateTime object and I cannot see how it could be instantiated with anything other than numeric values - in this case '8' representing the day of the month. –  Anthony Walsh Nov 3 '13 at 23:51
    
In that case, it's correct. If you were to, I don't know, replace the numeric value with the textual representation of the number, it would be wrong. I suppose that's up to whoever is doing the replacing though, to know this and replace '8t' with 'eight', or more correctly, replace '8' with 'eigh'. –  Greg Nov 4 '13 at 0:36
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Here is extended version including 11th, 12th and 13th:

DateTime dt = DateTime.Now;
string d2d = dt.ToString("dd").Substring(1);
string daySuffix =
    (dt.Day == 11 || dt.Day == 12 || dt.Day == 13) ? "th"
    : (d2d == "1") ? "st"
    : (d2d == "2") ? "nd"
    : (d2d == "3") ? "rd"
    : "th";
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and what about "11th", "12th" and "13th"? –  sjngm Oct 11 '11 at 21:10
    
I must have missed this. I fixed that above. –  Piotr Lewandowski Oct 12 '11 at 8:59
    
FYI if this was needed for numbers greater than ("dd") would produce, use string.PadLeft() –  maxp Feb 6 '12 at 13:20
    
@PiotrLewandowski - You not from Manchester by any chance? Cause I know one from there. Too freaky +1 btw –  ppumkin Apr 8 '13 at 16:06
    
+ 1, works well –  Corbin Spicer Nov 11 '13 at 10:56
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I believe this to be a good solution, covering numbers such as 111th etc:

private string daySuffix(int day)
{
    if (day > 0)
    {
        if (day % 10 == 1 && day % 100 != 11)
            return "st";
        else if (day % 10 == 2 && day % 100 != 12)
            return "nd";
        else if (day % 10 == 3 && day % 100 != 13)
            return "rd";
        else
            return "th";
    }
    else
        return string.Empty;
}
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Although this is a more general purpose method, for any number, not just month days (I think). –  Duncan Feb 12 '13 at 22:42
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Using a couple of extension methods:

namespace System
{
    public static class IntegerExtensions
    {
        public static string ToOccurrenceSuffix(this int integer)
        {
            switch (integer % 100)
            {
                case 11:
                case 12:
                case 13:
                    return "th";
            }
            switch (integer % 10)
            {
                case 1:
                    return "st";
                case 2:
                    return "nd";
                case 3:
                    return "rd";
                default:
                    return "th";
            }
        }
    }   

    public static class DateTimeExtensions
    {
        public static string ToString(this DateTime dateTime, string format, bool useExtendedSpecifiers)
        {
            return dateTime.ToString(format)
                .Replace("nn", dateTime.Day.ToOccurrenceSuffix().ToLower())
                .Replace("NN", dateTime.Day.ToOccurrenceSuffix().ToUpper());
        } 
    }
}

Usage:

return DateTime.Now.ToString("dddd, dnn MMMM yyyy", useExtendedSpecifiers: true);
// Friday, 7th March 2014

Note: The integer extension method can be used for any number, not just 1 to 31. e.g.

return 332211.ToOccurrenceSuffix();
// th
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in the MSDN documentation there is no reference to a culture that could convert that 17 into 17th. so You should do it manually via code-behind.Or build one...you could build a function that does that.

public string CustomToString(this DateTime date)
    {
        string dateAsString = string.empty;
        <here wright your code to convert 17 to 17th>
        return dateAsString;
    }
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I did it like this, it gets around some of the problems given in the other examples.

    public static string TwoLetterSuffix(this DateTime @this)
    {
        var dayMod10 = @this.Day % 10;

        if (dayMod10 > 3 || dayMod10 == 0 || (@this.Day >= 10 && @this.Day <= 19))
        {
            return "th";
        }
        else if(dayMod10 == 1)
        {
            return "st";
        }
        else if (dayMod10 == 2)
        {
            return "nd";
        }
        else
        {
            return "rd";
        }
    }
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For what its worth here is my final solution using the below answers

     DateTime dt = DateTime.Now;
        string d2d = dt.ToString("dd").Substring(1); 

        string suffix =
       (dt.Day == 11 || dt.Day == 12 || dt.Day == 13) ? "th"
       : (d2d == "1") ? "st"
       : (d2d == "2") ? "nd"
       : (d2d == "3") ? "rd"
       : "th";


        Date.Text = DateTime.Today.ToString("dddd d") + suffix + " " + DateTime.Today.ToString("MMMM") + DateTime.Today.ToString(" yyyy"); 
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Here's an extension method (because everyone loves extension methods), with Lazlow's answer as the basis (picked Lazlow's as it's easy to read).

Works just like the regular ToString() method on DateTime with the exception that if the format contains a d or dd, then the suffix will be added automatically.

/// <summary>
/// Return a DateTime string with suffix e.g. "st", "nd", "rd", "th"
/// So a format "dd-MMM-yyyy" could return "16th-Jan-2014"
/// </summary>
public static string ToStringWithSuffix(this DateTime dateTime, string format, string suffixPlaceHolder = "$") {
    if(format.LastIndexOf("d", StringComparison.Ordinal) == -1 || format.Count(x => x == 'd') > 2) {
        return dateTime.ToString(format);
    }

    string suffix;
    switch(dateTime.Day) {
        case 1:
        case 21:
        case 31:
            suffix = "st";
            break;
        case 2:
        case 22:
            suffix = "nd";
            break;
        case 3:
        case 23:
            suffix = "rd";
            break;
        default:
            suffix = "th";
            break;
    }

    var formatWithSuffix = format.Insert(format.LastIndexOf("d", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) + 1, suffixPlaceHolder);
    var date = dateTime.ToString(formatWithSuffix);

    return date.Replace(suffixPlaceHolder, suffix);
}
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Another option using the last string character:

public static string getDayWithSuffix(int day) {
 string d = day.ToString();
 if (day < 11 || day > 13) {
  if (d.EndsWith("1")) {
   d += "st";
  } else if (d.EndsWith("2")) {
   d += "nd";
  } else if (d.EndsWith("3")) {
   d += "rd";
  } else {
   d += "th";
 } else {
  d += "th";
 }
 return d;
}
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This gives 11st, 12nd, and 13rd... –  AakashM Oct 11 '12 at 13:23
    
Thanks AakashM your right, I've editted to correct the mistake. –  Jodda Oct 23 '12 at 9:35
    
Now it gives 1th, 2th, and 3th. –  AakashM Oct 23 '12 at 9:39
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A cheap and cheerful VB solution:

litDate.Text = DatePart("dd", Now) & GetDateSuffix(DatePart("dd", Now))

Function GetDateSuffix(ByVal dateIn As Integer) As String

    '// returns formatted date suffix

    Dim dateSuffix As String = ""
    Select Case dateIn
        Case 1, 21, 31
            dateSuffix = "st"
        Case 2, 22
            dateSuffix = "nd"
        Case 3, 23
            dateSuffix = "rd"
        Case Else
            dateSuffix = "th"
    End Select

    Return dateSuffix

End Function
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protected by Brian Mains Mar 6 at 15:37

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