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Can anyone explain the subtype(<:) in the following code? Why it could be used like that? When we use that? Thanks.

trait SwingApi {

    type ValueChanged <: Event

    val ValueChanged: {
       def unapply(x: Event): Option[TextField]
    }

    type ButtonClicked <: Event

    val ButtonClicked: {
        def unapply(x: Event): Option[Button]
    }

    type TextField <: {
        def text: String
        def subscribe(r: Reaction): Unit
        def unsubscribe(r: Reaction): Unit
    }

    type Button <: {
        def subscribe(r: Reaction): Unit
        def unsubscribe(r: Reaction): Unit
    }

}
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2  
Although this question seems interesting—what you're actually asking about isn't clear. Are you asking specifically about using <: with structural types, or just about <: in general? –  DaoWen Dec 11 '13 at 1:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I know that code! :)

So let's make sure you understand what <: means, just in case. A <: B means that A must be a subtype of B, or, to put it in other words, every instance of A will be an instance of B as well (but not vice versa).

We know, for example, that every java class is <: Object (such as String <: Object).

Next, why type ValueChanged <: Event. This is usually found in the cake pattern, but I'll skip an explanation of that (the lesson did mention the cake pattern, and provided a link iirc).

What that means is that for anything that extends SwingApi, the type ValueChanged must be a subtype of Event. That makes it possible to call Event methods on anything that is declared with the type ValueChanged, without knowing beforehand exactly what type is that.

That is similar to the next use:

type TextField <: {
    def text: String
    def subscribe(r: Reaction): Unit
    def unsubscribe(r: Reaction): Unit
}

We are declaring here that TextField should have those methods, so when we get something of the type TextField (such as returned by the ValueChanged extractor), we can call these methods on it. We could write code like this:

trait MyStuff extends SwingApi {
  def subscribeTo(event: ValueChanged) = event match {
    case ValueChanged(textField) => textField.subscribe(myReaction)
  }

  def myReaction: Reaction
}

At this point, neither SwingApi nor MyStuff know what types are going to be used for ValueChanged or TextField, and, yet, they can use them in normal code.

One interesting fact that is often overlooked about type declarations is that they can be overridden by classes. That is, I can write something like this:

class SwingImpl extends SwingApi {
  class TextField {
    def text: String = ???
    def subscribe(r: Reaction): Unit = ???
    def unsubscribe(r: Reaction): Unit = ???
  }

  // etc
}

Finally, you might wonder what use is this. I'll give one example. Naturally, you want the production code to show graphical elements on the screen and such, and, perhaps, you could write a separate class that implements it in a web server. But, and I think course takes advantage of it, you could write the class that implements it not as something that displays these components, but as test classes, that verify that the interaction with these components is being done correctly.

That is, you can have a SwingImpl that extends SwingApi and show the stuff on your desktop, and a SwingTest that also extends SwingApi, but simply let people verify what is being done.

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Thank you for your answer! I still have a little confusion. Is the ValueChanged here just a subtype of Event with an additional method unapply() ? Why in the SwingImpl class, it could be assigned like type ValueChanged = scala.swing.event.ValueChanged? Is the TextField the subtype of an "anonymous trait" ({ def text: String def subscribe(r: Reaction): Unit def unsubscribe(r: Reaction): Unit })? Thanks. –  Fake Dec 11 '13 at 4:35
    
@Fake Scala has two namespaces: types and values. The declaration type ValueChanged <: Event creates a ValueChanged identifier on the type namespace. The declaration val ValueChanged : { ... } creates a ValueChanged identifier on the value namespace, so it is completely separate. The value ValueChanged has type "something that defines an unapply method taking an Event argument and returning an Option[TextField]", while the type ValueChanged is a subtype of Event. The two are unrelated, aside from having the same name in different namespaces. –  Daniel C. Sobral Dec 11 '13 at 16:29
    
@Fake Next question, it could be assigned because types can be assigned, as long as they obey inherited constraints. Since scala.swing.event.ValueChanged is a subtype of Event, that type assignment is valid. TextField is a subtype of a structural type with that definition (or, alternatively, a subtype of a type refinement ). –  Daniel C. Sobral Dec 11 '13 at 16:32
    
Two namespaces. Interesting! I mostly got you and still need time to digest. Thank you so much! –  Fake Dec 12 '13 at 4:27

By virtue of the abstract type members ValueChanged and ButtonClicked, trait SwingApi is itself uninstantiable (all traits are, but if they are fully implemented, they are trivially turned into a concrete class that can be instantiated).

These constraints say that instantiable subtypes of SwingApi must define ValueChanged and ButtonClicked as subtypes of Event.

The type aliases TextField and Button are constrained as structural types (they need not particular subclass relationship, but simply must supply the specified members with the specified types).

The why of it is simply generality. This imposes the minimal constraints on the implementors of trait SwingApi necessary for it to be used by code that demands a SwingApi.

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Thank you all the same! –  Fake Dec 12 '13 at 4:28

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