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In my Rails 4.0.2 application, an Account has_many Users, and each User belongs_to an Account. My Users can be created in one of two ways:

(a) Simultaneously with Account creation, by a post to Account#create. (Account#new displays a nested form which accepts attributes both for the Account and its first User.)

(b) In a post to User#create, made by a User with administrator privileges.

In both cases I'm validating the new User with validates :email, presence: true.

When validation fails in (a), I want to display the error message 'Please enter your email.'

When validation fails in (b), I want to display the error message 'Please enter the new user's email.'

In both cases I'm creating a User and using the same validation. The only difference is the controller action that initiates the User creation.

What's the best way to get my application to display two different error messages?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Make sure you are displaying flash messages on your page, and then just send the appropriate message as a flash message in your controller. Something like this:

class AccountsController < ApplicationController
  def create
    # code to build @account and @user, as a transaction
    if @account.save
      redirect_to wherever_you_want_url
    else
      if @user.errors.messages[:email] == ["can't be blank"]
        flash.now[:notice] = "Please enter your email."
        render :new
      end
    end
  end

...

class UsersController < ApplicationController
  before_filter check_privileges!, only: [:new, :create]

  def create
    # code to build @user
    if @user.save
      redirect_to wherever_you_want_url
    else
      if @user.errors.messages[:email] == ["can't be blank"]
        flash.now[:notice] = "Please enter the new user's email."
        render :new
      end
    end
  end
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That code works if the error string is made into an array: if @user.errors.messages[:email] == ["can't be blank"] No need to use a flash notice, I can also just set @user.errors.messages[:email] directly to my new desired value. –  gyardley Dec 11 '13 at 4:36
    
@gyardley Good catch. And yes, editing the error directly would integrate seamlessly into your code. I couldn't see your code, so I just made something that worked generically. If everything else is good, do you mind accepting this answer? –  RustyToms Dec 11 '13 at 4:47
    
This answer definitely works (thank you!) but this issue shows up in a few places in my code and I don't like the added complexity in my controllers. I'm going to wait a couple of days to see if anyone else chips in - if not, I'll accept this. –  gyardley Dec 11 '13 at 5:26

Alright, after a bit of fumbling around here's my shot at it.

First, define a class variable in the User class:

class << self; attr_accessor :third_person end

Next, create a class method in the User class:

def self.third_person_helper(field, error)
  return @third_person ? I18n.t("form.errors.third_person.#{field}.#{error}") : I18n.t("form.errors.first_person.#{field}.#{error}")
end

(Why a class variable and method? Because we'll be calling this from a validates statement, where I believe we've just got access to the class and not its instance. Trying to work with an instance method here just resulted in 'method not found' errors.)

Now, set up your two sets of error messages in your locale files:

en:
  form:
    errors:
      third_person:
        email:
          blank: "this user's email can't be blank"
          taken: "this user's email is already in use"
          ...
      first_person:
        email:
          blank: "your email can't be blank"
          taken: "your email is already in use"
          ...

Next, set up your validations like so, passing along the field and attribute you're validating:

validates :email, presence: { message: Proc.new { third_person_helper("email", "blank") } }
validates :email, presence: { message: Proc.new { third_person_helper("email", "taken") } }
...

Now that you've done that, you can switch to the third-person set of error messages just by setting User.third_person = true in your controller action, before you try and validate:

def create
  # build the user here
  User.third_person = true
  if @user.save
    # whatever you like
  else
    render :new
  end
end

Finally, add this after_validation filter in your model, so you don't later get the third-person set of messages when you don't want them:

after_validation { User.third_person = false }

(If you want to avoid this filter, you can, but you'll have to call User.third_person = false in every controller action where you want to use the first-person set of messages.)

Whew. I like the solution I came up with because it doesn't clutter up the controllers with conditional code, but it's certainly more difficult to understand. If I had to program nicely with others I'd go the simpler route. I think it also violates Model-View-Controller best practices a bit by setting that model's class variable in the controller.

Because simpler's usually better, I'm accepting the other answer here as correct.

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