Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
class Person {
private String name;
private int age;

Person() {
    this.name = "";
    this.age = 0;
}

Person(String name, int age) {
    this.name = name;
    this.age = age;
}

void getName(String name) {

}
}

I am new to Java and was practicing making objects. In the code above I created a Person object with two overloaded constructors. I hope those are correct. I tried making a method without specifying that returns void and got an error. Do methods inside of objects always require a return type? I'm not sure why the IDE gave me an error when I didn't specify it as void.

*edit I realized I never actually created the Person object, only the Person class.

share|improve this question
    
What error? You just haven't specified any access modifier, so you have to be careful where you are trying to call the constructor or method. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Dec 11 '13 at 4:45
    
There is no error in your code. And what you have defined are constructors and not normal methods. –  Juned Ahsan Dec 11 '13 at 4:46
    
@SotiriosDelimanolis That is not an issue –  sᴜʀᴇsʜ ᴀᴛᴛᴀ Dec 11 '13 at 4:46
    
@sᴜʀᴇsʜᴀᴛᴛᴀ On its own, it isn't. But trying to call the getName method from a class in another package is. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Dec 11 '13 at 4:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

All methods require a return type, or void, as part of their signature. void indicates that you are not returning anything, or if the return keyword is used, it is not followed by any value.

Constructors are special - they are not defined with a return type, as they always return the object they are instantiating and they are always named the same as the class name.

share|improve this answer
    
So what I have done for my getName() method was correct? I just have to specify the return type of each method inside an object. –  AvP Dec 11 '13 at 4:51
    
I see nothing syntatically wrong with your method. Sure, there's no method body, but that's still syntatically correct...If this were a conventional getter, however, its return type would be the same as the field you're returning (in this case, String), and it would accept no arguments. –  Makoto Dec 11 '13 at 4:52
public class Person {
private String name;
private int age;

public Person() 
{
this.name = "";
this.age = 0;
}

public Person(String name, int age) {
this.name = name;
this.age = age;
}

public static Person GetObect() 
{
    return new Person("Steven N",22);


}
public void ShowDetails()
{
System.Out.Println("Name "+this.name+" and age is "+this.age);

}

}
class TestObject
{
public static void main(string arg[])
{
Person ob=Person.GetObject();
ob.ShowDetails();
}

}

Hope this will help you.

share|improve this answer
    
This helps a lot, thank you! –  AvP Dec 11 '13 at 4:58
    
you are Welcome Steven N . –  Muhammad Dec 11 '13 at 5:01
    
@StevenN Please free to ask any queries as you are a beginner? –  SpringLearner Dec 11 '13 at 5:04
    
ok can we acess private constructor... ? @SteveN –  Muhammad Dec 11 '13 at 5:06
    
ok StevenN doesn't matter carry your work hard if any problem occurs in java, C#, VB.NET , SQl , MySQL , SQL Server 2008 feel free you can contact me on this email address essa_rind2002@yahoo.com or you can add me on facebook facebook.com/GeoRind –  Muhammad Dec 11 '13 at 5:18

where is the person object you created,there are only 2 constructor, one method and a class Person.Object are created like this way Person p =new Person(); All methods must have a return type like void or int or String or anything that extends Object class but constructor do not have any return type As you are new to java see this link to know the different ways of creating objects

share|improve this answer
    
constructor don't have any return type ... If you specify return type in constructor you will get compilation error. –  Muhammad Dec 11 '13 at 5:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.