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Looking at some code, learing about threads:

import java.applet.*;
import java.awt.*;

public class CounterThread extends Applet implements Runnable
{ 
 Thread t; 
 int Count;

 public void init() 
 { 
  Count=0;
  t=new Thread(this);
  t.start();
 }

 public boolean mouseDown(Event e,int x, int y)
 { 
  t.stop();
  return true;
 }

 public void run()
 {
  while(true)
  {
   Count++;
   repaint();
   try {
    t.sleep(10);
   } catch (InterruptedException e) {}
  }
 }

 public void paint(Graphics g)
 {
  g.drawString(Integer.toString(Count),10,10);
  System.out.println("Count= "+Count);
 }

 public void stop()
 {
  t.stop();
 }
}

In the constructor:

public void init()  {   
    Count=0;
    t=new Thread(this);
    t.start();
}

why doesn't this constructor keep going infinitely? it looks like it inits, starts a new thread passing itself which calls the constructor again (I thought), which createds a new thread, etc.

I am missing something fundemental. Thank you for any help

sorry i cannot make the code look right. for some reason when i paste the lines up top don't get in the code parser.

EDIT: Thank you for the answers. For the sake of argument then, to make it an infinite loop would you add this instead:

t=new Thread(new CounterThread());
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4  
technically, public void init() is NOT a constructor –  Bozho Jan 12 '10 at 18:38
4  
Not even "technically"; it simply isn't. –  Lawrence Dol Jan 12 '10 at 19:06
    
Regarding the edit about using "new CounterThread": No, it wouldn't result in an infinite loop. It would result in a new Thread being created with a new instance of CounterThread as its runnable, nothing more and nothing less. If you want an infinite loop you should create one. Threads will, by definition, not hold up the method creating the thread. The whole purpose of them is that they run in parallell without holding you up. –  Fredrik Jan 12 '10 at 19:25
    
Btw, just to make sure, you do understand that your class doesn't have a constructor and that init() is just another method (which happens to be part of the Applet interface)? –  Fredrik Jan 12 '10 at 19:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The passing of this does not call the constructor, it passes a reference. It is a reference to the instance of CounterThread that you are in the process of creating.

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1  
Actually, as Bozho points out, init() is not a constructor. –  Powerlord Jan 12 '10 at 19:07

this is not the init method, it is the class instance (= the object) being initialized by that method.

So the constructor is not be called anymore implicitly.

A Thread, when started, executes the run() method.

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When the new thread is started, it doesn't call the constructor, it would call run(). So no infinite loop here.

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When you pass this, the constructor is not called again.

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init() is not a constructor! –  Jarrod Roberson Jan 12 '10 at 19:37

Since everyone else has covered the new Thread(this) bit, I'll address the other side.

When you start an applet, this is pseudocode for what the applet container does:

Applet applet = new CounterThread();
applet.init();
applet.start();

Since CounterThread has no constructor, Java creates an empty default constructor.

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Your Constructor doesn't loop forever because t.start(); returns immediately. The body of run() method runs in a different thread.

EDIT : Looks like there is no Constructor involved as others have mentioned. But this logic still holds true.

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2  
Another important reason is that he doesn't have a constructor :) –  Fredrik Jan 12 '10 at 18:54

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