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I have been working on this program for a while and can't figure out how to sort one of my lists from the contents in the second list. For this program, I have a list of words and I also have a list of how many times the word is in the file I opened. I need to sort the word list according to the frequency of the word in descending order. I have to write a separate function to do this according to the assignment. I have a function that was given to the class to use but it only sorts one list. Here is the function I have and need to modify:

def selectionsort(mylist):
    for i in range(len(mylist)):
       max_i = i
       for j in range( i + 1, len(mylist) ):
           if mylist[j] > mylist[max_i]:
                max_i = j
       temp = mylist[max_i]
       mylist[max_i] = mylist[i]
       mylist[i] = temp

I currently have two lists that look like this:

mylist = ["the", "cat", "hat", "frog"]
frequency = [4, 1, 2 ,1]       

4 is the frequency of "the", 1 is the frequency of "cat" and so on.

My goal is to have mylist sorted like this:

 mylist = ["the", "hat", "cat", "frog"]

How should i modify the function i have so it sorts mylist using the corresponding values from the frequency list?

I am using Python 3.3

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marked as duplicate by alko, tiago, Oleh Prypin, plannapus, joaquin Dec 23 '13 at 19:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Take 2 lists to start with. Whenever you swap, remember to swap the same positions in the two lists. Also, a pythonic approach would be to zip the lists, sort it with one of the elements, and get the other items as the result. –  Thrustmaster Dec 11 '13 at 8:52

4 Answers 4

Here you go! Using sorted and zip:

sortedlist = [i[0] for i in sorted(zip(mylist, frequency), key=lambda l: l[1], reverse=True)]

Here's a little demo:

>>> mylist
['the', 'cat', 'hat', 'frog']
>>> frequency = [4, 1, 3, 2]
>>> sortedlist = [i[0] for i in sorted(zip(mylist, frequency), key=lambda l: l[1], reverse=True)]
>>> sortedlist
['the', 'hat', 'frog', 'cat']

Hope this helps!

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One line. Touché –  yuvi Dec 11 '13 at 8:53
1  
Although correct, the OP would like to modify his code, not replace it entirely. Check my comment below the question. –  Thrustmaster Dec 11 '13 at 8:54
    
@Thrustmaster /sigh. You're right, but making it ourself is far easier than fixing others'. Hahaha. Hang on a second –  aIKid Dec 11 '13 at 8:55
    
Exactly the reason why I commented. Rolling out our code is far easier, but it seldom helps someone who wants to learn & know whats wrong with his code :) –  Thrustmaster Dec 11 '13 at 8:56
2  
@aIKid This answer is wrong in the way that it is not what OP requested. –  Saša Šijak Dec 11 '13 at 8:57
def selectionsort(mylist, frequences):
    for i in range(len(mylist)):
       max_i = i
       for j in range( i + 1, len(mylist) ):
           if frequences[j] > frequences[max_i]:
                max_i = j
       temp = mylist[max_i]
       mylist[max_i] = mylist[i]
       mylist[i] = temp
       temp = frequences[max_i]
       frequences[max_i] = frequences[i]
       frequences[i] = temp

You just have to incorporate frequences list in to the function and compare its values instead mylist values, and swap it`s values along the mylist values.

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zip(*sorted(zip(frequency, mylist))[::-1])[1]
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mylist = ["the", "cat", "hat", "frog"]
frequency = [4, 1, 2 ,1]
adict = dict(zip(mylist, frequency))
sorted(mylist, key = lambda x:adict[x], reverse = True)

a slightly different version. I believe it's more straightforward than the 1st answer, although more expensive (by making a new dict).

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