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I´m doing an example using Date and Calendar classes, this is my code:

DateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:00Z");
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
cal.set(Calendar.YEAR, 2013);
cal.set(Calendar.MONTH, Calendar.SEPTEMBER);
cal.set(Calendar.DATE, 1);
cal.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 12);
cal.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 15);
Date date = cal.getTime();
TimeZone tz = TimeZone.getTimeZone("IST");


dateFormat.setTimeZone(tz);
String actual = dateFormat.format(date);

System.out.println(actual);

I would expect as result 2013-09-01 12:15:00+0530 but the value return is 2013-09-01 15:45:00+0530 and I don´t know why.

share|improve this question
3  
"dude using calendar and timezone" Don't call me 'dude'. Seriously, what is that title supposed to mean? – Andrew Thompson Dec 11 '13 at 8:59
7  
I'm also using DDD - Dude-Driven Development. – vikingsteve Dec 11 '13 at 9:00
2  
it's the timezone – Thufir Dec 11 '13 at 9:03
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm going to move a few things around

DateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:00Z");
TimeZone tz = TimeZone.getTimeZone("IST"); // <-- Move this here.

Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
cal.setTimeZone(tz);                       // <-- So we can use it here.
cal.set(Calendar.YEAR, 2013);
cal.set(Calendar.MONTH, Calendar.SEPTEMBER);
cal.set(Calendar.DATE, 1);
cal.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 12);
cal.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 15);
Date date = cal.getTime();
dateFormat.setTimeZone(tz);                // <-- And here.

Then your code produces your expected output. That is

2013-09-01 12:15:00+0530
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package stackoverflow;

import java.text.DateFormat;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.Date;

public class StackOverflow {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        DateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:00Z");
        Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
        cal.set(Calendar.YEAR, 2013);
        cal.set(Calendar.MONTH, Calendar.SEPTEMBER);
        cal.set(Calendar.DATE, 1);
        cal.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 12);
        cal.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 15);
        Date date = cal.getTime();
//        TimeZone tz = TimeZone.getTimeZone("IST");
      //  dateFormat.setTimeZone(tz);
        String actual = dateFormat.format(date);

        System.out.println(actual);
    }
}

gives:

run:
2013-09-01 12:15:00-0700
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 1 second)

which is, I think, along the lines of what you want. The timezone is changing the time.

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The Calendar instance that you created must also be told about the timezone, i.e.:

Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("IST"));

Otherwise, it would take the timezone of your machine.

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DateFormat and Calendar depend on timezone. While creating date and formatting use specific timezone.

DateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:00Z");
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("IST"));
cal.set(Calendar.YEAR, 2013);
cal.set(Calendar.MONTH, Calendar.SEPTEMBER);
cal.set(Calendar.DATE, 1);
cal.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 12);
cal.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 15);
Date date = cal.getTime();
dateFormat.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("IST"));
String actual = dateFormat.format(date);

System.out.println(actual);
share|improve this answer

The Joda-Time abides.

I suspect your direct problem is that you instantiated the Calendar instance using your own environment's time zone, then switched the time zone on that already existing object. That seems to be what the other answers point to.

A side problem is using a three-letter code for identifying a time zone. They are not standard and have many duplicates. In your case, did you mean IST to be India Standard Time or Irish Standard Time? Use a named time zone instead.

But your bigger problem is using the java.util.Date/Calendar classes at all. They are notoriously bad.

Joda-Time

Here's the same kind of code but done properly in Joda-Time 2.3.

Note in particular that I am not setting a time zone on the formatter. The DateTime object knows its own time zone.

    // © 2013 Basil Bourque. This source code may be used freely forever by anyone taking full responsibility for doing so.
    // import org.joda.time.*;
    // import org.joda.time.format.*;

    DateTimeZone kolkataTimeZone = DateTimeZone.forID( "Asia/Kolkata" );
    DateTime kolkataDateTime = new DateTime( 2013, DateTimeConstants.SEPTEMBER, 1, 12, 15, 0, kolkataTimeZone );
    System.out.println( "kolkataDateTime: " + kolkataDateTime );

    // If you really cannot stand the 'T'.
    DateTimeFormatter formatter = DateTimeFormat.forPattern( "yyyy-MM-dd' 'HH:mm:ssZ" );
    System.out.println( "kolkataDateTime sans 'T': " + formatter.print( kolkataDateTime ) );

When run…

kolkataDateTime: 2013-09-01T12:15:00.000+05:30
kolkataDateTime sans 'T': 2013-09-01 12:15:00+0530
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