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I suspect i could be blamed for OT here, please forgive me for this. -just in case-

I have a small problem, which i felt much as philosophical than a real programming issue, but still makes me uncomfortable and i wish some expert opinion about.

Let's assume we are using a template function which behave almost the same way for all the possible types T which it is allowed to manipulate:

//Perform the rendering
template< typename T >
long drawing_facility::render( typename object_cnt< T >::type& elements, draw_type type )
{
    ....
    //Any computation needed?
    if( !obj->render_init_done.test_and_set( std::memory_order::memory_order_acquire ) )
    {
        ....
    }
    ....
}

In this code i skipped all what i think is unnecessary except a if statement. The if checks an atomic flag in the object which is handled, in order to determine if a special 'computation' is needed on it, if it is needed something has to be done before continuing with the 'common' tasks.

My problem is that render is a template, is supposed to behave in the same way for all the possible and allowable T, but in case render_init_done is set to false something different needs to be done, the code in the if is not common for all the Ts.

I solved this very quickly by adding a second parameter to the template, this parameter tells the code which type the template is handling, and on the base of that a different operation is performed in the if.

I really suspect that this is not exactly the most elegant way to solve the problem, do you have any opinion on how to manage this function differently?

I want to avoid a huge duplication and also too many function calls, something like this should do the job:

//Perform the rendering
template< typename T >
long drawing_facility::render( typename object_cnt< T >::type& elements, draw_type type )
{
    render_part_a< T >( elements );
    //Any computation needed?
    if( !obj->render_init_done.test_and_set( std::memory_order::memory_order_acquire ) )
    {
        ...
    }
    render_part_b< T >( elements );
}

//Perform the rendering, part a
template< typename T >
long drawing_facility::render_part_a( typename object_cnt< T >::type& elements )
{
    ...
}

//Perform the rendering, part b
template< typename T >
long drawing_facility::render_part_b( typename object_cnt< T >::type& elements )
{
    ...
}

But is this the better way to approach the problem? Now the a call to render implies two other function calls, which shouldn't be a great deal, until i can guarantee the independence of render_part_a and render_part_b, actually i can, but only with some dirty hacks and subtle parameter-passing-workaround.

Thanks

Small update: After the suggestion of @Nim i think the problem can be solved using some overloaded functions, please have a look at this very basic example in which i removed the second parameter from render -not needed anymore-:

typedef enum draw_type {
    draw_text = 0,
    draw_vertex = 1
} draw_type;

class drawable
{
public:
    virtual void foo() = 0;
};

class text : drawable
{
public:
    void foo() {};
};

class vertex : drawable
{
public:
    void foo(){};
};

template< typename T >
class drawable_object
{ };

template< typename T >
struct object_cnt
{
    typedef std::vector< std::shared_ptr< drawable_object< T > > > type;
};

class drawing_facility
{
    void special( drawable_object< text >* obj )
    {
         std::cout<<"text\n";
    }
    void special( drawable_object< vertex >* obj )
    {
        std::cout<<"vertex\n";
    }
    public:
        template< typename T >
        long render( typename object_cnt< T >::type& elements )
        {
            //...
            for( auto obj : elements )
            {
                //...
                //the 'if' statement should be here.
                special( obj.get() );
                //...
            }
       //...
       }
};

int main()
{
    typename object_cnt< text >::type a;
    a.push_back( shared_ptr< drawable_object< text > >() );
    typename object_cnt< vertex >::type b;
    b.push_back( shared_ptr< drawable_object< vertex > >() );
    drawing_facility draw;
    draw.render< text >( a );
    draw.render< vertex >( b );
}

Hope the code is clear enough.

share|improve this question
    
I'm not quite sure I understand your question. You talk about that if and how the code in it must be different for some types; yet your solution doesn't show any change to that part. –  dyp Dec 11 '13 at 9:10
    
Perhaps i removed too much code, in the if statement the code checks the value of type and perform the proper action. –  fjanisze Dec 11 '13 at 9:14
    
@fjanisze : Pls consider up-voting, if you found an answer useful. –  NeonGlow Dec 11 '13 at 10:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The second strategy you've adopted does not make sense to me...

I would do use your original approach, but for the specialized computation, overload a function for each T, for example..

struct A{}; struct B{}; struct C{};

void compute(A& obj)
{ 
  // code for A
}

void compute(B& obj)
{ 
  // code for B
}

void compute(C& obj)
{ 
  // code for C
}

template <typename T>
void render(T& obj)
{
  .. // common stuff

  if (!obj.computed())
  {
    // now call overloaded function
    compute(obj);
  }

  .. // common stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a good idea, i made a small PoC which work pretty well, i will follow up with a small code example. –  fjanisze Dec 11 '13 at 9:54

Could it be better if you use inline template specialization function instead of if in your code? That should have no performances issue

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