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I would like to search through range of lines in a file between the lines that begins with start and ends with End and replace the newlines with colon. I need this to be done in SED or AWK.

Example file:

start
a
b
c
End
Start
a
b
c
End
Start
x
y
z
End

Expected Output:

a:b:c
a:b:c
x:y:z
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sed is an excellent too for simple substitutions on a single line. Period. Do not even consider sed for anything else, that's what awk is for. –  Ed Morton Dec 11 '13 at 18:01

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

this short awk one-liner should work:

 awk -v RS='Start|End' -v OFS=":" '$1=$1' file

with your data:

kent$  cat f
Start
a
b
c
End
Start
a
b
c
End
Start
x
y
z
End

kent$  awk -v RS='Start|End' -v OFS=":" '$1=$1' f
a:b:c
a:b:c
x:y:z
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Thanks Kent. It is working fine. –  user3090943 Dec 11 '13 at 13:35
    
@user3090943 Since you're new here, please don't forget to mark the answer accepted if your problem is already solved. You can do it clicking on the check mark beside the answer to toggle it from hollow to green. See Help Center > Asking if you have any doubt! –  fedorqui Dec 11 '13 at 13:38
2  
I think it should be mention that this need gnu awk due to multiple characters in RS. But its a nice solution :) –  Jotne Dec 11 '13 at 13:56
    
the '$1=$1' force re-computation of $0, getting rid of leading/trailing spaces, and changing the ones in the "middle" to be replaced by the OFS ':'. From posix awk: "Setting any other field causes the re-evaluation of $0." (the RS=... line changes record separator from the usual "newline" to either "Start" or "End" (so your file could contain only "Start ... a b c ... Start" and still work. Note that "$1=$1" also force it to only match lines containing something –  Olivier Dulac Dec 11 '13 at 17:09

Here is one version:

awk '/End/{print a;f=a=0} f {a=a?a":"$0:$0} /(S|s)tart/{f=1}' file
a:b:c
a:b:c
x:y:z

I guess there is a typo in the first start, if so use:

awk '/End/{print a;f=a=0} f {a=a?a":"$0:$0} /Start/{f=1}' file

/End/{print a;f=a=0} If line contains End print a, and set f and a to 0
f {a=a?a":"$0:$0} If f is true, set a to $0 for first run and then :$0 on the next run
/Start/{f=1} If line has Start set f to 1 (true)

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The example which i gave in the question has only a,b,c or x,y,z but my actual file has Space in between. your solution also worked.. Thanks :) –  user3090943 Dec 11 '13 at 14:23

Let's give a try with awk.

$ awk '/start/ || /Start/ {next} /End/ {print line; line=""; next} {if (line) {line=line":"} line=line$0}' file
a:b:c
a:b:c
x:y:z

Explanation

  • /start/ || /Start/ {next} on lines containing "start" or "Start", skip.
  • /End/ {print line; line=""; next} on lines containing End, print the line variable that contains the loaded information. Delete the value of the var and go to the next line.
  • {if (line) {line=line":"} line=line$0} on the rest of the lines, keep loading data in the line variable. The if condition is to avoid having a trailing :.

The /start/ || /Start/ {next} can be reduced to both of these (thanks Jotne):

/start|Start/ {next}

/(s|S)tart/ {next}
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/start/ || /Start/ can be shorten to /(start|Start)/ or /start|Start/ or like I do /(S|s)tart/ –  Jotne Dec 11 '13 at 12:57
    
Fair enough, @Jotne. I had learnt it from your answer but did not want to copy into mine. Updated with a comment at the end. Thanks! –  fedorqui Dec 11 '13 at 13:05
    
/start/ || /Start/ should be written as /[Ss]tart/. –  Ed Morton Dec 11 '13 at 17:58

If there are always 3 lines between start and end:

grep -iv 'start\|end' file | paste -d: - - -
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No i have uneven number of lines. I wil note down your answer too. It will be helpful for me –  user3090943 Dec 11 '13 at 14:24
sed -n '/Start/,/End/ {
   /Start/ !{
      /End/ !H
      }
   /End/ {
      s/.*//
      x
      s/\n/:/g
      s/://
      p
      }
   }
/Start/,/End/ !p' YourFile

If start and Start should work replace Start by [sS]tart (and End by [eE]nd) in the code

Explaination

Start sed without printing the ouptut unless specific request

/Start/,/End/ {

For any block of line starting with Start and ending with End (on separate line)

/Start/ !{
          /End/ !H
          }

if line doesn not contain (the ! ) Start than End, Add (append) the line to the holding buffer (kind of storage)

/End/ {
   s/.*//
   x
   s/\n/:/g
   s/://
   p
   }

when reach the line that contain End

  1. Delete current line (the one with End)
  2. exchange ( x )the Hold Buffer (with all line of the bloc stored) and Working Buffer (the one that can be manipulate and normaly have the current line)
  3. Change all new line with : (the buffer contain all the line separate by new line after exchange)
  4. remove first : (due to first Append that insert a new line)
  5. print the content

    /Start/,/End/ !p

for all the line not ( ! ) between the block between Start and End, print it

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It is working!!!. But sounds too complicated for me. Can you Explain this ? –  user3090943 Dec 11 '13 at 14:29
    
I add in answer for better understanding for new reader of the post –  NeronLeVelu Dec 11 '13 at 15:07

Just an alternative approach with GNU awk:

$ gawk -v RS='\0' '{ gsub(/\n/,":"); gsub(/:End:Start:/,"\n"); gsub(/^start:|:End:$/,"") }1' file     
a:b:c
a:b:c
x:y:z

Other awk solutions posted here are fine too.

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