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EDIT: the point is about answering the question not giving alternatives like we have meat instead of fish, I know there are simpler alternatives about it

Huge thanks to abelenky for his answer and to David Norris as well


For a specified number I would like to return 1 if that number is not 0 otherwise return 0 and without having to use a for...loop, if or bool.

In this document it does work fine except for 0 :

Bit Hack #8. Right propagate the rightmost 1-bit.

y = x | (x-1) 

...

This is not a clean hack, tho, as it produces all 1's if x = 0.

The best thing I came up with is the following (for a byte type) :

for (int i = 0; i < 256; i++)
{
    int o =
        ((i & (1 << 7)) >> 7) |
        ((i & (1 << 6)) >> 6) |
        ((i & (1 << 5)) >> 5) |
        ((i & (1 << 4)) >> 4) |
        ((i & (1 << 3)) >> 3) |
        ((i & (1 << 2)) >> 2) |
        ((i & (1 << 1)) >> 1) |
        ((i & (1 << 0)) >> 0);
    Debug.Assert((i == 0 & o == 0) || (i != 0 && o == 1));
    Console.WriteLine(@"i {0:D3} o {1:D3}", i, o);
}

However, looking at the disassembly it produces all this code :

        int o =
            ((i & (1 << 7)) >> 7) |
            ((i & (1 << 6)) >> 6) |
            ((i & (1 << 5)) >> 5) |
            ((i & (1 << 4)) >> 4) |
            ((i & (1 << 3)) >> 3) |
            ((i & (1 << 2)) >> 2) |
            ((i & (1 << 1)) >> 1) |
            ((i & (1 << 0)) >> 0);
0000021f  mov         eax,dword ptr [ebp-6Ch] 
00000222  mov         edx,80h 
00000227  and         eax,edx 
00000229  sar         eax,7 
0000022c  mov         edx,dword ptr [ebp-6Ch] 
0000022f  mov         ecx,40h 
00000234  and         edx,ecx 
00000236  sar         edx,6 
00000239  or          eax,edx 
0000023b  mov         edx,dword ptr [ebp-6Ch] 
0000023e  mov         ecx,20h 
00000243  and         edx,ecx 
00000245  sar         edx,5 
00000248  or          eax,edx 
0000024a  mov         edx,dword ptr [ebp-6Ch] 
0000024d  mov         ecx,10h 
00000252  and         edx,ecx 
00000254  sar         edx,4 
00000257  or          eax,edx 
00000259  mov         edx,dword ptr [ebp-6Ch] 
0000025c  mov         ecx,8 
00000261  and         edx,ecx 
00000263  sar         edx,3 
00000266  or          eax,edx 
00000268  mov         edx,dword ptr [ebp-6Ch] 
0000026b  mov         ecx,4 
00000270  and         edx,ecx 
00000272  sar         edx,2 
00000275  or          eax,edx 
00000277  mov         edx,dword ptr [ebp-6Ch] 
0000027a  mov         ecx,2 
0000027f  and         edx,ecx 
00000281  sar         edx,1 
00000283  or          eax,edx 
00000285  mov         edx,dword ptr [ebp-6Ch] 
00000288  mov         ecx,1 
0000028d  and         edx,ecx 
0000028f  or          eax,edx 
00000291  mov         dword ptr [ebp-70h],eax 

Is there another way using some clever logical operation that would not produce that many instructions ?

Note, the point here is not about reducing the number of instructions produced for the sake of performance, rather to know whether there as simpler way to do this.

Some people hinted to convert the number to a boolean but unfortunately this is not possible in C#, there are also the Convert.ToInt and Convert.ToBoolean methods that could be used for this but I don't want to use them.

share|improve this question
1  
I don't quite get your question here. Do you mean that you want to check whether or not any bit inside a integer is set as 1? What about just using return i!=0? –  Albus Shin Dec 11 '13 at 13:13
    
That would return a bool which in return would need an if to convert it back to either a 0 or 1. –  Aybe Dec 11 '13 at 13:33
    
This question doesn't seem C# specific at all. Its all about bit-twiddling, regardless of language. I'm removing the C# tag. –  abelenky Dec 11 '13 at 15:45
1  
"I don't want to do it the right (or easiest) way. Instead, I want to write many unnecessary, needless, and much more difficult to read and understand lines of code.". Is that right? (Well, it's either that or "My homework assignment is...", I suppose.) –  Ken White Dec 11 '13 at 16:16
    
I might deceive you but this ain't homework. –  Aybe Dec 11 '13 at 17:14
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This one seems to work for me.
(written in C. Should translate to your language easily)

Since its a bit complex, let me know if it passes your tests.

Basically, this is about subtracting 1 from the number, and examining how the low-bit and the sign-bit change relative to each other.

  • Start with x=0, the low-bit and sign bit are both 0.
    Subtract 1 from that, then the low-bit and sign bit are both 1.
    (the two bits move together; XOR both pairs to get zero, and OR those results to get zero)

  • Start with x=1, the low-bit is 1, and the sign bit is 0.
    Subtract 1, then the low-bit goes to 0, and the sign bit goes to 1.
    (the two bits move opposite each other; XOR the two pairs to get one, and OR those results to get one)

  • If you start with a larger number, the low-bit may-or-may-not be set, and the sign-bit can be in either state.
    Subtract one, and the sign-bit will stay the same, but the low-bit will get flipped.
    One of those two pairs will be mismatched.
    XOR the pairs of low-bit/sign-bit together.
    One pair will result in 1, and the other in 0.
    OR those results for an answer of 1.


// As a #Define:
#define one_if_any_bit(x) (((x)&1)^((x)>>31)|(((x)-1)&1)^(((x)-1)>>31))&1

int AnyBitSet(int x) // Assumes 32-bit ints.  Change the 31-constant if needed, otherwise
{
    return (( x    & 0x01) ^  (x    >> 31) |
            ((x-1) & 0x01) ^ ((x-1) >> 31)) & 1;
}


int main()
{
    for(int i=INT_MIN; i<=INT_MAX; ++i)
    {
        if (AnyBitSet(i) != 1)
        {
            // Expect this should ONLY be hit for i==0
            printf("%d: result %d\n", i, AnyBitSet(i)); 
        }
    }

    getchar();
    return 0;
}

Edit (2/2013, about 2 months after the original question)

Sometimes I just feel like a total dunce. After all that analysis of XOR'ing bits together, and accounting for edge cases, I found a trivially simple expression that does the same thing:

// Returns 1 for any non-zero number, 0 for zero.
int AnyBitSet(int x)
{
    return !!x;
}

If X is zero, !X is 1, and !!X is zero.
If X is non-zero, !X is 0, and !!X is exactly 1, regardless of the original X.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately it produces 1 for even numbers and 0 for odd numbers. –  Aybe Dec 11 '13 at 13:36
    
+1 Thanks I really appreciate your involvement, I'll try to improve it and come back here to update. –  Aybe Dec 11 '13 at 14:36
    
Excellent thank you ! Thanks for the time you've spent on it ! –  Aybe Dec 11 '13 at 17:10
1  
I think it might be a little more complicated than needed. You can do it by only looking at the sign, not the lowest bit. x => !(x & 0x80000000) ^ ((x-1) & 0x80000000) >> 31 –  Kennet Belenky Dec 11 '13 at 18:25
    
Thanks I'll give it a try. –  Aybe Dec 11 '13 at 18:50
show 2 more comments

Your question was: "Return 1 if any bit is set otherwise 0"

The answer is:

int AnyBitSet(int x)
{
    return (x == 0)? 0 : 1;
}

(perhaps you'd like to clarify your question?)

share|improve this answer
    
I've updated the question (I don't want to use a boolean in this case). –  Aybe Dec 11 '13 at 13:33
2  
I don't understand why you "don't want to use a boolean" operation. It is the best solution to whatever you are trying to ask. –  Kevin D. Dec 11 '13 at 15:10
    
I've asked about fish, not meat. Of course there's another way but that's not what the question is about. –  Aybe Dec 11 '13 at 16:47
    
@Aybe, you asked how to return 1 if any bit is set using some "logical operation". That sounds a lot like Boolean to me. –  mao47 Dec 11 '13 at 16:48
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OK, how about using the .NET Framework...

return Math.Abs(Math.Sign(x));
share|improve this answer
    
+1 That's very good but I'm looking for a logical operation. –  Aybe Dec 11 '13 at 14:37
    
You should have been more specific in your question. –  Mr Lister Dec 11 '13 at 14:43
    
Yes, sorry I've updated it. –  Aybe Dec 11 '13 at 16:44
add comment

How about this:

public static uint OneIfNonzero( uint x )
{
    x |= x >> 16;
    x |= x >> 8;
    x |= x >> 4;
    x |= x >> 2;
    x |= x >> 1;
    return x & 1;
}

The idea here is to use a series of ORs to propagate all the bits down to the least-significant bit. After the series of ORs is finished, the least-significant bit equals the OR of all 32 original bits. The remaining bits are then stripped off using the final AND.

The same idea could be adapted for use with numeric types of other sizes (ulong, ushort, etc.) or signed types.

share|improve this answer
    
That's exactly what I've posted in my question ... –  Aybe Dec 11 '13 at 16:43
2  
No it isn't. You're individually shifting over each bit. Mine shifts by half each time, which results in log(n) operations instead of n (for an n-bit number). I don't think you'll find anything simpler without using conditionals (which would be the altogether better solution anyway). –  TypeIA Dec 11 '13 at 17:02
    
Sorry I should have read better, you're right. It works as well, thank you. –  Aybe Dec 11 '13 at 17:18
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it cannot be done in a single logical operation - all logical operations are either bitwise, iterating like a for loop over the inputs, or they are cumulative, which also does not help your problem. You need a conditional (if / then) to solve this properly...

share|improve this answer
    
Not necessarily and there's no need to use conditionals, that's the whole point of this question. –  Aybe Dec 11 '13 at 16:45
    
Absolutely not true. My answer does it with AND, OR, XOR, BitShift, and -1 operations only. –  abelenky Dec 11 '13 at 17:29
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