Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to build a utility to extract embedded files from a PDF (see section 7.11.4 of the spec). However I want the utility to be "small" and not depend on a full PDF parsing framework. I'm wondering if the file format is such that a simple tool could scan through the document for some token or sequence, and from that know where to start extracting the embedded file(s).

Potential difficulties include the possibility that the token or sequence that you scan for could validly exist elsewhere in the document leading to spurious or corrupt document extraction.

I'm not that familiar with the PDF spec, and so I'm looking for

  • confirmation that this is possible
  • a general approach that would work
share|improve this question
1  
There are at least two scenarios that are going to make your life difficult: encrypted files, and object streams (a compressed object that contains a collection of objects inside). –  yms Dec 11 '13 at 15:47
1  
I'm not that familiar with the PDF spec - in that case first become familiar with it before attempting anything like that. –  mkl Dec 11 '13 at 16:03
    
@yms: I'm ok with not handling encrypted files (I assume you mean PDF's with a password?), but can you say more about object streams? –  brooks94 Dec 11 '13 at 16:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are at least two scenarios that are going to make your life difficult: encrypted files, and object streams (a compressed object that contains a collection of objects inside).

About the second item (object streams), some PDF generation tools will take most of the objects (dictionaries) inside a PDF file, put them inside a single object, and compress this single object (usually with deflate compression). These means that you cannot just skim through a PDF file looking for some particular token in order to extract some piece of information that you need while ignoring the rest. You will need to actually interpret the structure of PDF files at least partially.

Note that the embedded files that you want to extract are very likely to be compressed as well, even if an objects stream is not used.

Your program will need to be able to do at least the following:
- Processing xref tables
- Processing object streams
- Applying decoding/decompression filters to a data stream.

Once you are able to get all objects from the file, you could in theory go through all of them looking for dictionaries of type EmbeddedFile. This approach has the disadvantage that you might extract files that are not been referenced from anywhere inside the document (because a user deleted it at some point of the file's history for example)

Another approach could be to actually navigate through the structure of the file looking for embedded files on the locations specified by the PDF spec. You can find embedded files in at least the following elements (this list is from the top of my head, there might be a lot more that these):
- Names dictionary
- Document outlines
- Page annotations

share|improve this answer
1  
+1; another difficulty might be multi-revision documents with additions and removals of file attachments. –  mkl Dec 11 '13 at 19:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.