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Suppose my Makefile has the first target called "all", and so this is the default target. Then suppose I have a "clean" target, too. If I want to issue a "rebuild" command I can write:

make clean all

and they will be called in sequence. But suppose I don't want to explicitly name the "all" target and let make use the default one, like usually you do:

make

Now, how to implement the "rebuild" command using the default? It should be something like:

make clean .DEFAULT_GOAL

but that special variable does not work from command line.

It's little more than a curiosity, because one could define a "rebuild" target in the Makefile and use that variable (or type "make clean && make"), but is it possible in some way?

Thank you very much.

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There was a "Hi, " at the beginning of the question, but the site keeps cutting it away, sorry if it seems a little unpolite. –  m.alessandrini Dec 11 '13 at 15:48

1 Answer 1

There is no way to put a generic target name on the command line which means "the default target", without knowing the name of the default target and using that.

If that's what you're asking.

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Yes exactly that, it seemed strange to me that a rather complex program lacked that feature. –  m.alessandrini Dec 11 '13 at 17:02
    
I've never heard anyone ever ask for it before, and I've been using make for a really long time. It's actually not very useful to run a command like make clean all (or its equivalent, if such existed), at least not on modern build systems where parallel builds is supported. I think most people prefer to run two distinct commands or, if this is something people often want to do, create a specific rule in the makefile to do it (where it can be done correctly from a parallel build perspective). –  MadScientist Dec 11 '13 at 18:52

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