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I'm using matplotlib to plot a fairly dense dataset (up to 60000 values), and usually it works quite nice. However, if the dataset contains a few outliers, these get sometimes dropped:

[... 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 172, 962, 270, 93, 39, 24, 19, 18, 12, 28, 17, 18, 11,
 7, 7, 8, 6, 4, 3, 9, 5, 4, 3, 3, 3, 4, 3, 3, 2, 6, 3, 3, 3, 2, 1, 3, 2, 2, 1, 4,
 3, 0, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 5, 2, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 3, 0, 0, 1,
 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 3, ...] 

would result in a flat graph, not showing the spike up to almost 1000. Obviously this is very undesirable. Plotting works correctly if I switch to points instead of lines, but that's not as precise and harder to parse visually.

My code is really simple:

fig = pyplot.figure(figsize=(16, 8))
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
ax.plot(ts, my_points) 

png_file_in_memory = cStringIO.StringIO()
backend_agg.FigureCanvasAgg(fig).print_figure(png_file_in_memory)
return png_file_in_memory

Any ideas why this is happening and how to prevent it?

share|improve this question
    
Could you make this into a runnable example so we can see the results and what exactly is going wrong? My guess is that the spike doesn't show up due to resolution limitations (but it's just a guess). –  YXD Dec 11 '13 at 16:49
    
Hard to say... this works for me: a = np.random.rand(60000) a[np.random.randint(0,60000, 25)] = 25 plt.plot(a) –  askewchan Dec 11 '13 at 19:45

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