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I have to check for the tipping point that a number causes a type of overflow.

If we assume for example that the overflow number is 98, then a very inefficient way of doing that would be to start at 1 and increment 1 at a time. This would take 98 comparisons.

I punched out a better way of doing this as so

What it basically does change the check to the next power of two after a known failing condition, for example we know that 0 fails so we start checking at 1, then 2,4,8,...,128. 128 passes so we check 64+1,64+2,64+4,...,64+32, which passes but we know that 64+16 failed so we start the next round at 1+(64+16)===1+80. Here's a visual:

1   1
2   2
3   4
4   8
5   16
6   32
7   64
81  128 ->
9          1, 64 // 1 + 64
10         2, 64
11         4, 64
12         8, 64
13         16, 64
14         32, 64 ->
15                  1, 80
16                  2, 80
17                  4, 80
18                  8, 80
19                  16, 80
20                  32, 80 ->
21                            1, 96
22                            2, 96 // done

Is there some better way of doing this?

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Couldn't quite get you. Can you elaborate on your approach? –  user1990169 Dec 11 '13 at 17:30
    
using a binary search type algorithm would probably be your best bet here (which you have done, sort-of) Starting at some heuristically determined number might be better than starting at 1 –  Chris Dec 11 '13 at 17:32
1  
If you do not know the max, number, I think going with your initial approach to find the MIN=64, MAX=128 range is good. After that you should simply do a binary search (eg., look at 96, if it causes overflow, then you know the range is MIN=64, MAX=96). You keep having the range at each step, you will find solution faster. –  David Fleeman Dec 11 '13 at 17:32
    
@AbhishekBansal see edit –  MosheK Dec 11 '13 at 17:34
    
Can you explain what "meets a gt" means in your title? –  Kevin Dec 11 '13 at 17:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you do not know the max number, I think going with your initial approach to find the MIN=64, MAX=128 range is good. Doing a binary search AFTER you find a min/max will be most efficient (eg., look at 96, if it causes overflow, then you know the range is MIN=64, MAX=96). You keep halving the range at each step, you will find solution faster.

Since 98 was your answer, here is how it would pan out with a binary search. This takes 13 steps instead of 22:

// your initial approach
1   1
2   2
3   4
4   8
5   16
6   32
7   64
8   128 ->
// range found, so start binary search
9          (64,128) -> 96
10                  (96,128) -> 112
11                          (96,112) -> 104
12                                 (96,104) -> 100
13                                        (96,100) -> 98 // done
// you may need to do step 14 here to validate that 97 does not cause overflow
// -- depends on your exact requirement
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Thanks, I added an implmentation in javascript below –  MosheK Dec 11 '13 at 19:21

If you know that the "overflow function" is monotonically increasing, you can keep doubling until you go over, and then apply the classic binary search algorithm. This would give you the following search sequence:

1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128 -> over - we have the ends of our range

Run the binary search in [64..128] range

64..128, mid = 96
96..128, mid = 112
96..112, mid = 104
96..104, mid = 100
96..100, mid = 98
96..98,  mid = 97
97 - no overflow ==> 98 is the answer
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Here's how I implemented this technique in javascript:

function findGreatest(shouldPassCallback) {
    function findRange(knownGood, test) {
        if (!shouldPassCallback(test)) {
            return [knownGood, test];
        } else {
            return findRange(test, test * 2);
        }
    }
    function binarySearchCompare(min, max) {
        if (min > max) {
            throw 'Huh?';
        }
        if (min === max) { return shouldPassCallback(min) ? min : min - 1; }
        if (max - min === 1) { return shouldPassCallback(max) ? max : min }
        var mid = ~~((min + max) / 2);
        if (shouldPassCallback(mid)) {
            return binarySearchCompare(mid, max);
        } else {
            return binarySearchCompare(min, mid);
        }
    }
    var range = findRange(0, 1);
    return binarySearchCompare(range[0], range[1]);
}
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