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This example is with entity framework, but the question is more about how to await multiple async tasks within a loop. Say I have the following method on a custom DbContext class:

public async Task DiscardChangesAsync()
{
    foreach (var entry in ChangeTracker.Entries().Where(x => x != null))
    {
        switch (entry.State)
        {
            case EntityState.Added:
                entry.State = EntityState.Detached;
                break;
            case EntityState.Modified:
                entry.State = EntityState.Unchanged;
                break;
            case EntityState.Deleted:
                await entry.ReloadAsync(); // <-- only async method
                break;
        }
    }
}

The above compiles and runs, but I'm not sure how efficient it is. For example, if the context contains 10 deleted entity entries, the thread stops and waits at each ReloadAsync before it continues the loop, right? Is there any way to let the loop execution continue, and return a new Task that won't complete until all 10 of the ReloadAsync calls have completed?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To answer your question strictly:

public Task DiscardChangesAsync()
{
    List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();
    foreach (var entry in ChangeTracker.Entries().Where(x => x != null))
    {
        switch (entry.State)
        {
            case EntityState.Added:
                entry.State = EntityState.Detached;
                break;
            case EntityState.Modified:
                entry.State = EntityState.Unchanged;
                break;
            case EntityState.Deleted:
                tasks.Add(entry.ReloadAsync());
                break;
        }
    }

    return Task.WhenAll(tasks);
}

May be more efficient, though, to let EF handle reloading all of them at once:

public Task DiscardChangesAsync()
{
    List<DbEntityEntry> deleted = new List<DbEntityEntry>();

    foreach (var entry in ChangeTracker.Entries().Where(x => x != null))
    {
        switch (entry.State)
        {
            case EntityState.Added:
                entry.State = EntityState.Detached;
                break;
            case EntityState.Modified:
                entry.State = EntityState.Unchanged;
                break;
            case EntityState.Deleted:
                deleted.Add(entry);
                break;
        }
    }

    return ctx.RefreshAsync(RefreshMode.StoreWins, deleted);
}
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I would have to cast this to IObjectContextAdapter in order to invoke RefreshAsync. Any issues there? Wonder why they omitted that method from DbContext..? Also, shouldn't the argument be RefreshMode.StoreWins instead of RefreshMode.OverwriteCurrentValues? –  danludwig Dec 11 '13 at 18:58
    
Turns out the second more efficient option fails at runtime. After casting the DbContext to an IObjectContextAdapter and using RefreshMode.StoreWins to get it to compile, my integration test fails with "The element at index 0 in the collection of objects to refresh has a null EntityKey property value or is not attached to this ObjectStateManager." The first strict answer does not fail the integration test though. –  danludwig Dec 11 '13 at 19:06
    
Ahh, I gave you a LINQ to SQL RefreshMode. You are correct RefreshMode.StoreWins is the right one. –  Cory Nelson Dec 11 '13 at 19:07
    
I thought I'd done that to undelete entities before but I guess I was mistaken. –  Cory Nelson Dec 11 '13 at 19:09

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