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Pretty much as the title says: If you have a Type stored in a variable, there's no way to compare your actual object to this type variable, as far as I can tell. I can probably accomplish what I'm trying to do with mirrors, but I'd prefer not to if at all possible.

void example() {
  Type myType = String;
  String myExample = "Example";

  //Syntax error here: The name 'myType' is not a type and cannot be used in an 'is' expression
  if (myExample is myType) {

  }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can't generally test if a value is of a type using the Type object.

Type objects are reflected types, not real types. They represent the real type, but you can't use them in the code where you need a type: as type assertions, as generic type parameters or with the is/as operators. You must use the name of a type in those places, and not the name of a normal variable that happens to hold a Type object.

Clever stuff using mirrors might get there, but it's likely overkill for most cases (and I understand that you don't want it).

What you might be able to do instead, is to not pass around raw Type objects. You could instead make your own type abstraction, something like:

class MyType<T> {
  const MyType();
  Type get type => T;
  bool isA(Object object) => object is T;
}

Then you can use that to represent types, not a Type object, and do something like:

void main(List<String> args) {
  MyType myType = const MyType<String>();
  String myExample = "Example";

  if(myType.isA(myExample)) {
    print('is');
  } else {
    print('is not');
  }
}

That does require that your entire program uses your type objects to pass around types, but it also gives you a lot of control over those objects, so you can implement the functionality that you need.

share|improve this answer
    
Definitely a neat idea. Ideally I'd be able to do what my example showed. Unfortunately, for my own purposes, I don't think it will work. This needs to work with ANY types, even some I haven't heard of, as other people will be using the code I'm writing. Requiring them to create all kinds of helper objects isn't very nice. – mrand01 Dec 12 '13 at 18:49
import 'package:reflection/reflection.dart';

void main() {
  var childType = typeInfo(Child);
  var baseType = typeInfo(Base);

  if(childType.isA(baseType)) {
    print("Child is Base");
  }

  if(baseType.isAssignableFrom(childType)) {
    print("Base is assignable from Child");
  }
}

class Base {
}

class Child extends Base {
}
Child is Base
Base is assignable for Child

P.S.

The "reflection" package incompatible with dart2js. It work only when used in Dart language.

share|improve this answer

I tried

library x;

void main(List<String> args) {
  Type myType = String;
  String myExample = "Example";

  if(myExample.runtimeType == myType) {
    print('is');
  } else {
    print('is not');
  }
}

and it worked. I have not much experience with such code in Dart though. Maybe that is not a fail-safe approach.

share|improve this answer
1  
That will only detect if the type is EXACTLY what you're looking for. It won't detect subtypes, interfaces, etc – mrand01 Dec 11 '13 at 20:54

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