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I have to send a packet that has packet structure of:

1 byte padding (0x0)
2 byte (uint16) opcode
1 byte padding (0x0)
x bytes raw struct

So I need a way to put a uint16 into my byte array.

byte[] rawData = new byte[x+4];
rawData[0] = 0;
rawData[1] = (uint16-highbyte?) opcode;
rawData[2] = (uint16-lowbyte?) opcode;
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3 Answers 3

rawData[1] = (byte) (opcode >> 8);
rawData[2] = (byte) opcode;

The >> is a signed right shift operator. It will shift bits to the right, repeating the leftmost bit at the left, to keep the signed two-complement number valid.

For example:

+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
| 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 |  = 0x0301
+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+

0x0301 >> 8 =

+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
| 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 1 |  = 0x0003
+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+

The (byte) cast will keep only the lower 8 bits of your data. So:

                                +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
(byte) (0x0301 >> 8) =          | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 1 |  = 0x03
                                +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+

                                +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
(byte) 0x0301 =                 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 |  = 0x01
                                +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
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Always best to explain your answers a little –  New Alexandria Dec 11 '13 at 20:38
    
Especially the part where you always write 0 in rawData[1]. –  Hans Passant Dec 11 '13 at 22:12
    
Corrected, thank you –  ericbn Dec 12 '13 at 14:59

here's another approach.

fixed(short* ps = &rawData[1]){
    *ps = opcode;
}

GOOD LUCK!

Update

Both of these produce the same result.

byte[] rawData = new byte[4];
short opcode = 16859;

fixed (void* ps = &rawData[1]) {
    *(short*)ps = opcode;
}

Console.WriteLine(BitConverter.ToInt32(rawData, 0));

byte[] opBytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(opcode);

rawData = new byte[4];
rawData[1] = opBytes[0];
rawData[2] = opBytes[1];

Console.WriteLine(BitConverter.ToInt32(rawData, 0));
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1  
Endian-ness is not a detail that can be ignored here. –  Hans Passant Dec 11 '13 at 20:53
    
A packet needs to be portable between programs running on different platforms with different endianness. So native endian code like yours is a bad idea. The OP's example uses big-endian, so your code doesn't match it even if you assume that the code only runs on little endian systems. –  CodesInChaos Dec 11 '13 at 21:34
    
good point CodesInChaos. we were writing our posts at the same time. –  drankin2112 Dec 11 '13 at 21:39

C# has things for doing this already....

BitConverter.GetBytes(opcode);

Documented here :-

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fk3sts66.aspx

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Keith, you mean .NET has them, not C#. C# has nothing like it. –  John Saunders Dec 11 '13 at 20:41
1  
Keep endianness in mind. –  Tim S. Dec 11 '13 at 21:01

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