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I have a method which is templated and I want it to call a different method depending on the template. The reason I have this is so that the caller does not need to create an Object of type B just to get the correct implementation called, instead they should be able to just choose by the implementation by templating.

The problem is i'm receiving reference type to a const as the template T and I do not know how to use this to choose the correct overloaded method. Ideally this would also work if T were not a reference type. Any idea?

Note: I can't use template specialization because I need the impl virtual.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A {};
class B {};

class C {
public:

    template <typename T>
    void f() {
        // T = const B&
        impl(T()); // error: value-initialization of reference type ‘const B&’
    }

protected:
    virtual void impl(const A& a) {
        cout << "A";
    }

    virtual void impl(const B& b) {
        cout << "B";
    }
};

int main() {
    C c;
    const B &b2 = B();
    c.f<decltype(b2)>(); // T = const B&
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
check out std::enable_if and std::is_lvalue_reference –  erenon Dec 11 '13 at 21:04
    
try c.f<B>(); –  Bryan Chen Dec 11 '13 at 21:05
    
Bryan, in the actual code, this template ends up being called with const B& and possibly B –  Rodrigo Salazar Dec 11 '13 at 21:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to get a type [more] likely to be constructible, you should remove any references, e.g., using std::remove_reference<T> and all qualifiers, e.g., using std::remove_cv<T>. ... or, just std::decay<T> the type which also transforms arrays into pointers:

template <typename T>
void f() {
    impl(typename std::decay<T>::type());
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is really cool. (And it works for me) What does it really mean when you write 'typename' before std::decay? –  Rodrigo Salazar Dec 11 '13 at 21:12
1  
The typename is needed to make the compiler use std::decay<T>::type as a type rather than as a value: the type is a dependent name: its interpretation depends on the template parameter T. In a specialization of std::decay it could be a value and when seeing the definition of f() the compiler doesn't necessarily know. The typename is used to disambiguate between nested types and nested values and is necessary every time a dependent name should be a type (and in pre-C++11 it was only allowed where it really does that; in C++11 you can also put it in places where it isn't needed). –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 11 '13 at 21:16

You can still use template specialization through a helper private template dispatcher to call correct version of impl - which can still be virtual. Like this, compiles and runs

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A {};
class B {};

class C {
public:

    template <typename T>
    void f() {
        // T = const B&
        impl_dispatch<T>(); // error: value-initialization of reference type ‘const B&’
    }

protected:
    virtual void impl(const A& a) {
        cout << "A";
    }

    virtual void impl(const B& b) {
        cout << "B";
    }
private:
   template <typename T>
   void impl_dispatch();
};

template <>  void C::impl_dispatch<A const &>()
{
impl(B());
}

template <>  void C::impl_dispatch<B const &>()
{
impl(A());
}

int main() {
    C c;
    const B &b2 = B();
    c.f<decltype(b2)>(); // T = const B&
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem here is that if someone pass T = A into f(), then impl_dispatch doesn't have an specialization for A and B which aren't const references so you need to define those as well. It works, but more code. –  Rodrigo Salazar Dec 11 '13 at 21:14
1  
Yes, other solution is more elegant. Just wanted to point out that template specialization can still work trough this trick, despite the need for impl to be virtual. –  Ilya Kobelevskiy Dec 11 '13 at 21:18

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