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I have a Linux server running a Java-jar file that enrypts several files.

The Android and iPhone App download that file and shall decrypt it. What algorithm I have to use to do so.

I recognized that algorithms I used in Java, do not work in Android. What I did in Java was:

private static byte[] encrypt(byte[] raw, byte[] clear) throws Exception {
    SecretKeySpec skeySpec = new SecretKeySpec(raw, "AES");
    Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
    cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, skeySpec);
    byte[] encrypted = cipher.doFinal(clear);
    return encrypted;
}

what didnt work. Any alternatives?

share|improve this question
    
"What did not work" is not only textually incorrect, it is a horrible description as well. What did try do on the client side? How did you transport the ciphertext? –  Maarten Bodewes Jan 5 '14 at 17:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

iOS:

I use NSString+AESCrypt (https://github.com/Gurpartap/AESCrypt-ObjC)

Sample:

NSString* encrypted = [plainText AES256EncryptWithKey:@"MyEncryptionKey"];
NSString* decrypted = [encrypted AES256DecryptWithKey:@"MyEncryptionKey"];

Android (AES256Cipher - https://gist.github.com/dealforest/1949873):

Encrypt:

String base64Text="";
try {
    String key = "MyEncryptionKey";
    byte[] keyBytes = key.getBytes("UTF-8");
    byte[] ivBytes = { 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00 };
    byte[] cipherData;

    //############## Request(crypt) ##############
    cipherData = AES256Cipher.encrypt(ivBytes, keyBytes, passval1.getBytes("UTF-8"));
    base64Text = Base64.encodeToString(cipherData, Base64.DEFAULT);
}
catch ( Exception e ) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}        

Decrypt:

String base64Text="";
String plainText="";
try {
    String key = "MyEncryptionKey";
    byte[] keyBytes = key.getBytes("UTF-8");
    byte[] ivBytes = { 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00 };
    byte[] cipherData;

    //############## Response(decrypt) ##############
base64Text = User.__currentUser.getPasscode();
    cipherData = AES256Cipher.decrypt(ivBytes, keyBytes, Base64.decode(base64Text.getBytes("UTF-8"), Base64.DEFAULT));
    plainText = new String(cipherData, "UTF-8");            
}
catch ( Exception e )
{
    e.printStackTrace();
}
share|improve this answer
    
In Objective-C exceptions are only used for non-recoverable programming errors and are considered non-recoverable. (Distributed Objects are the exception). –  zaph Dec 20 '13 at 12:06
    
This had be stumped, the default behaviour on AESCrypt-ObjC is to use nil IV, and in java you have to explicitly set a blank byte array and shown here. Thanks a ton! –  scottyab Sep 26 '14 at 11:13

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