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In our application we have case-insensitive semantics configured at session level:

alter session set NLS_COMP=LINGUISTIC;
alter session set NLS_SORT=BINARY_AI;

but then I want to have a table with a NAME column with binary semantics, so I defined an function-based index accordingly:

create table RAW_SCREEN (
   ID   number(10)     constraint RSCR_PK primary key,
   NAME nvarchar2(256) not null
);
create unique index RSCR_IDX on RAW_SCREEN (nlssort(NAME, 'NLS_SORT=BINARY'));

I would have expected the query below to take advantage of the function-based index:

select * from RAW_SCREEN where 
    nlssort(NAME, 'NLS_SORT=BINARY') = nlssort(N'raw_screen1', 'NLS_SORT=BINARY');

but it doesn't. The query plan shows a table scan. While experimenting, I've discovered that a simple index on NAME does the trick:

create unique index RSCR_IDX2 on RAW_SCREEN (NAME);

When running the query again, the RSCR_IDX2 index was used successfully.

Now, that is not very surprising, but I can't understand why the first function-based index was not used by the optimizer. The indexed expression matches exactly the expression used in the WHERE condition. Do you have any idea why it wasn't used?

NOTE: This was run on Oracle 10.2

Here's a full test script if you want to try it out:

alter session set NLS_COMP=LINGUISTIC;
alter session set NLS_SORT=BINARY_AI;

create table RAW_SCREEN (
   ID                   number(10)            constraint RSCR_PK primary key,
   NAME                 nvarchar2(256)        not null
);

create unique index RSCR_IDX on RAW_SCREEN (nlssort(NAME, 'NLS_SORT=BINARY'));
--create unique index RSCR_IDX2 on RAW_SCREEN (NAME);

begin
  for i in 1..10000
  loop
    insert into RAW_SCREEN values (i, 'raw_screen' || i);
  end loop;
end;
/
commit;

select * from RAW_SCREEN where nlssort(NAME, 'NLS_SORT=BINARY') = nlssort(N'raw_screen1000', 'NLS_SORT=BINARY');
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Expressions are converted to NLS session settings in DML, but not in DDL.

This is arguably a bug with the behavior of NLSSORT(char, 'NLS_SORT=BINARY').
From the manual: "If you specify BINARY, then this function returns char." But that is not true for the index. Normally it is very convenient that the index expression does not undergo any transformation; if it depended on session settings than tools like DBMS_METADATA.GET_DDL would have to return many alter session statements. But in this case it means that you can create an index that will never be used.

The explain plan shows the real expression. Here's how Oracle uses nlssort in a session without it being explicitly used:

alter session set nls_comp=linguistic;
alter session set nls_sort=binary_ai;
drop table raw_screen;
create table raw_screen (
   id   number(10)     constraint rscr_pk primary key,
   name nvarchar2(256) not null
);
create unique index idx_binary_ai
      on raw_screen (nlssort(name, 'nls_sort=binary_ai'));
explain plan for select * from raw_screen where name = n'raw_screen1000';
select * from table(dbms_xplan.display(format=>'basic predicate'));

Plan hash value: 2639454581

-----------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                   | Name          |
-----------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT            |               |
|   1 |  TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| RAW_SCREEN    |
|*  2 |   INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | IDX_BINARY_AI |
-----------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   2 - access(NLSSORT("NAME",'nls_sort=''BINARY_AI''')=HEXTORAW('0072006
              10077005F00730063007200650065006E003100300030003000'))

This example shows that nlssort(char, 'nls_sort=binary') is dropped by the DML:

alter session set nls_comp=linguistic;
alter session set nls_sort=binary_ai;
drop table raw_screen;
create table raw_screen (
   id   number(10)     constraint rscr_pk primary key,
   name nvarchar2(256) not null
);
create unique index idx_binary_ai on
      raw_screen (nlssort(name, 'nls_sort=binary_ai'));
explain plan for select * from raw_screen where
  nlssort(name,'nls_sort=binary') = nlssort(N'raw_screen1000','nls_sort=binary');
select * from table(dbms_xplan.display(format=>'basic predicate'));

Plan hash value: 237065300

----------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation         | Name       |
----------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT  |            |
|*  1 |  TABLE ACCESS FULL| RAW_SCREEN |
----------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   1 - filter("NAME"=U'raw_screen1000')

In summary - index DDL needs to exactly match the transformed expressions, which can depend on session settings and the unusual behavior of binary.

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