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I have a table that looks like this:

CREATE TABLE foo (type integer, priority integer);

'type' is one of a small number of values.

I want to do a query to select a sample rows of some type ordered by priority:

SELECT * FROM foo WHERE type = 0 ORDER BY priority DESC LIMIT 100;

I'm trying to create an index to make this fast. But it seems like sqlite doesn't allow me to handle both of the following cases:

  1. Most items in foo have type = 0. In that case we should use the index to find the highest priority items and then check which ones have type = 0.
  2. Most items in foo have type != 0. In that case we should use an index on type to find items of type = 0 and then sort them.

I can get sqlite to use either of these, but I can't figure out if it's possible to have a single index/query that's efficient for both cases. It seems like an index on (type, priority) would work, but it looks like sqlite is only using it for the first lookup and not the ORDER BY.

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Which or what is your index? –  Jade Dec 12 '13 at 2:25
    
I'm trying to figure out what to make the index. All the indices I tried don't give good performance for both cases :(. –  Andrey Dec 12 '13 at 2:39
    
find out which fields/columns will be used in your Where clause this is a good start. second, how many records currently you have? –  Jade Dec 12 '13 at 2:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A single index on both columns allows to use an execution plan that is efficient in both cases:

> CREATE INDEX t_p ON foo(type, priority);
> EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN SELECT * FROM foo WHERE type = 0 ORDER BY priority DESC LIMIT 100;
0|0|0|SEARCH TABLE foo USING COVERING INDEX t_p (type=?)
> .explain on
> EXPLAIN SELECT * FROM foo WHERE type = 0 ORDER BY priority DESC LIMIT 100;
addr  opcode         p1    p2    p3    p4             p5  comment
----  -------------  ----  ----  ----  -------------  --  -------------
0     Trace          0     0     0                    00
1     Noop           0     0     0                    00
2     Integer        100   1     0                    00
3     Goto           0     15    0                    00
4     OpenRead       2     3     0     k(3,B,B,B)     00
5     Integer        0     2     0                    00
6     SeekLe         2     13    2     1              00
7       IdxLT          2     13    2     1              00
8       Column         2     0     4                    00
9       Column         2     1     5                    00
10      ResultRow      4     2     0                    00
11      IfZero         1     13    -1                   00
12    Prev           2     7     0                    00
13    Close          2     0     0                    00
14    Halt           0     0     0                    00
15    Transaction    0     0     0                    00
16    VerifyCookie   0     2     0                    00
17    TableLock      0     2     0     foo            00
18    Goto           0     4     0                    00

First, SQLite opens the index and quickly searches the last record where the type column is less than or equal to zero (6 SeekLe). Then it returns results from the index, going backwards (12 Prev), until it encounters an index entry where the type column is less than zero (7 IdxLT).

This is a single scan through the index that never needs to skip over an unwanted entry.

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