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Just reading Stroustrup's C++ Programming Language 4th Ed and in chapter 7 he says:

move(x) means static_cast<X&&>(x) where X is the type of x

and

Since move(x) does not move x (it simply produces an rvalue reference to x) it would have been better if move() had been called rval()

My question is, if move() just turns the variable in to an rval, what is the actual mechanism which achieves the "moving" of the reference to the variable (by updating the pointer)??

I thought move() is just like a move constructor except the client can use move() to force the compiler??

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marked as duplicate by Ralph Tandetzky, PlasmaHH, Christian Rau, Reno, OwenP Dec 12 '13 at 15:15

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Move constructors do the moving (and they are deemed "moved constructors" by the virtue of them accepting an rvalue reference), and std::move explicitly makes something an rvalue, enabling the constructor be used. –  GManNickG Dec 12 '13 at 2:48
    

9 Answers 9

up vote 6 down vote accepted

what is the actual mechanism which achieves the "moving" of the reference to the variable (by updating the pointer)??

Passing it to a function (or constructor) that takes an rvalue reference, and moves the value from that reference. Without the cast, variables cannot bind to rvalue references, and so can't be passed to such a function - this prevents variables from being accidentally moved from.

I thought move() is just like a move constructor except the client can use move() to force the compiler??

No; it's used to convert an lvalue into an rvalue in order to pass it to a move constructor (or other moving function) which requires an rvalue reference.

typedef std::unique_ptr<int> noncopyable;  // Example of a noncopyable type
noncopyable x;
noncopyable y(x); // Error: no copy constructor, and can't implicitly move from x
noncopyable z(std::move(x)); // OK: convert to rvalue, then use move constructor
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When you are calling move, you are just telling "Hey, I want to move this object". And when constructor accepts rvalue-reference, it understands it as "Hmm, someone want I move data from this object into myself. So, OK, I'll do it".

std::move does not moves or changes object, it just "marks" it as "ready-for-moving". And only function, that accepts rvalue reference should implement moving actual object.

This is an example, that describes the text above:

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo(std::size_t n): _array(new int[n])
    {

    }

    Foo(Foo&& foo): _array(foo._array)
    {
        // Hmm, someone tells, that this object is no longer needed
        // I will move it into myself
        foo._array = nullptr;
    }

    ~Foo()
    {
        delete[] _array;
    }

private:
    int* _array;
};

int main()
{
    Foo f1(5);

    // Hey, constructor, I want you move this object, please
    Foo f2(std::move(f1));

    return 0;
}
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As in Going Native 2013, Scott Meyers gave the talk about C++ 11 features, including move.

What std::move essentially do is "unconditionally casts to a rvalue".

My question is, if move() just turns the variable in to an rval, what is the actual mechanism which achieves the "moving" of the reference to the variable (by updating the pointer)??

move does the type casting, thus the compiler will know which ctor to use. The actual move operation is done by the move ctor. You can take it as a function overloading. (ctor overloads with the rvalue parameter type.)

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from http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/move

std::move obtains an rvalue reference to its argument and converts it to an xvalue.

Code that receives such an xvalue has the opportunity to optimize away unnecessary overhead by moving data out of the argument, leaving it in a valid but unspecified state.

Return value

static_cast<typename std::remove_reference<T>::type&&>(t)

you can see move is just static_cast

by calling std::move on an object doesn't really doing anything useful, however it tells that the return value can be modified to "a valid but unspecified state"

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I thought move() is just like a move constructor except the client can use move() to force the compiler??

By essentially casting the type to an r-value type, this allows the compiler to invoke the move constructor over the copy constructor.

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std::move is equivalent to static_cast<std::string&&>(x).

In the standard, it is defined like this:

template <class T>
constexpr remove_reference_t<T>&& move(T&&) noexcept;
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as straustrups mentioned in his book, move is the wrong name, but rval would be better. the mechanism is just take the pointer from one instance (lets say inst_1) to another (inst_2) and null the first one.

inst_1 = std::move(inst_2);

the move is, simply said only to differ between the kind of the type. it's not a value, it's not a reference, but a r-value reference.

the mechanism do what you or the programmer who made the class, wants to. consider:

class foo {
  int*   bar_;
  size_t size_;
public:
  void do_it(foo& cpy) {   // copy
    // copy the size
    bar_ = new int[size_ = cpy.size_];

    // copy the array
    for(auto i=0; i<size_t; i++)
      bar_[i] = cpy.bar_[i];
  }

  void do_it(foo&& mov) {  // move
    // copy the pointer
    bar_ = mov.bar_;
    // copy the size
    size_ = mov.size_;

    // null the pointer and size
    mov.bar_ = nullptr;
    mov.size_ = 0;

    // the pointer and size is now moved or stolen...
  }
};

the first one is a copy a l-value do_it and the second a move a r-value one. not the std::move moves the instace-members but the function wich is decided by l/r-value. movee turns if possible the instance to a r-value.

foo inst_1, inst_2;
inst_1.do_it(inst_2);  // copy
inst_1.do_it(std::move(inst_2));  // move

also that's why it probably would be better to name it rval: inst_1.do_it(std::rval(inst_2)); would make more sense in this kind of behavior.

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rvalues are generally temporary values which are discarded and destroyed immediately after creation (with a few exceptions). std::string&& is a reference to a std::string that will only bind to an rvalue. Prior to C++11, temporaries would only bind to std::string const& -- after C++11, they also bind to std::string&&.

A variable of type std::string&& behaves much like a bog-standard reference. It is pretty much only in the binding of function signatures that std::string&& differs from std::string& variables.

On the other hand, if a function returns a std::string&&, it is very different than returning a std::string&, because the second kind of thing that can be bound to a std::string&& is the return value of a function returning std::string&&.

std::move is the most common way to generate such a function. In a sense, it lies to the context it is in and tells it "I am a temporary, do with me what you will". So std::move takes a reference to something, and does a cast that makes it pretend to be a temporary -- aka, rvalue.

Move constructors and move assignment and other move-aware functions take an rvalue reference to know when the data they are passed is "scratch" data that they can "damage" to some extent when using it. This is very useful because many types (from containers, to std::function, to anything that uses the pImpl pattern, to non-copyable resources) can have their internal state moved much easier than it can be copied. Such a move changes the state of the source object: but because the function is told it is scratch data, that isn't impolite.

So the move happens not in std::move, but in the function that understands that the return value of std::move implies that it is permitted to modify the data in a somewhat destructive manner if that would help it.

The other ways you can get an rvalue, or an indication that the source object is "scratch data", is when you have a true temporary (an anonymous object created as the return of some other function, or one created using function-style constructor syntax), or when you return from a function with a statement of the form return local_variable;. In both cases, the data binds to rvalue references.

The short version is that std::move does not move, and std::forward does not forward, it just indicates that such an action would be allowed at this point, and lets the function/constructor being called decide what to do with that information.

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Complementing other answers, an example could help you to better understand how rvalue references work. Take a look to the following code that emulates rvalue references:

#include <iostream> 
#include <memory>

template <class T>
 struct rvalue_ref
 {
    rvalue_ref(T& obj) : obj_ptr{std::addressof(obj)} {} 

    T* operator->() //For simplicity, we'll use the reference as a pointer.
    { return obj_ptr; }

    T* obj_ptr; 
 };

template <class T>
 rvalue_ref<T> move(T& obj)
 {
    return rvalue_ref<T>(obj);
 }


template <class T>
 struct myvector
 {
    myvector(unsigned sz) : data{new T[sz]} {}

    myvector(rvalue_ref<myvector> other) //Move constructor
    {
        this->data = other->data;
        other->data = nullptr;
    }

    ~myvector()
    {
       delete[] data;
    }

    T* data; 
 }; 

int main()
{
    myvector<int> vec(5); //vector of five integers

    std::cout << vec.data << '\n'; //Print address of data

    myvector<int> vec2 = move(vec); //Move data from vec to vec2

    std::cout << vec.data << '\n'; //Prints zero

    //Prints address of moved data (same as first output line)
    std::cout << vec2.data << '\n'; 
}

As we can see, "move" only generates the correct alias, to indicate to the compiler which constructor overload want to use. The difference between this implementation and real rvalue references is of course that casting to rvalue reference has zero overhead, since it's only a compiler directive.

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