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Consider this example :

T(n) = T(7n/8) + 2n 

I assumed T(1) = 0

and tried to solve it in the following way

T(n) = T(7n/8) + 2n
     = T(49n/64) + 2.(7n/8) + 2n
     = T(343n/512) + 2.(7n/8).(7n/8)+ 2.(7n/8) + 2n 
     = T(1) + 2n ( (7n/8)^i + ..... + 1)               

but I could not come to any conclusion about this. I am confused about what should I do in the next step.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your approach is sound, but you'll see what to do if you rewrite it slightly differently:

T(n) = T((7/8)^1 * n) + 2 * (7/8)^0 * n
     = T((7/8)^2 * n) + 2 * (7/8)^1 * n + 2 * (7/8)^0 * n
     = T((7/8)^3 * n) + 2 * (7/8)^2 * n + 2 * (7/8)^1 * n + 2 * (7/8)^0 * n
     .
     .
     .
     = T((7/8)^k * n) + 2 * n * sum j = 0 to k-1 (7/8)^j

Now, let k tend to infinity and see what happens. It would help if you're familiar with geometric series.

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If I take k -> infinity then on the right part I will get 8 as S(inf) = a/1-r = 1/(1-7/8) = 8 which results in an order of O(n) . Again I am not sure whether it is correct :( –  Tasbeer Jan 13 '10 at 0:41
1  
That's exactly right! The sum is 8. Now what happens to (7/8)^k as k tends to infinity? –  Jason Jan 13 '10 at 0:48
    
mmm that would be infinity –  Tasbeer Jan 13 '10 at 0:56
1  
What does it look like if you compute (7/8)^0, (7/8)^1, (7/8)^2, (7/8)^3, ... using a calculator? Compute as many terms as you need until you understand what it is happening. –  Jason Jan 13 '10 at 1:05
1  
Yes! And this is clearly O(n) as you stated before. Very nice work. –  Jason Jan 13 '10 at 1:55

T(n) = T(7n/8) + 2n = 2n * (1 + 7/8 + (7/8)^2 + ... (7/8)^Z) + T(1) where Z = ?

The only trick is finding Z. I bet a log will help. Sorry it is late, and I am not thinking straight, but ... you should not need to add multiple 2n.

Edit: Z is how many time you need to multiply n by 7/8 until you get 1.

So, n * 7^Z / 8^Z = 1

(7/8)^Z = 1/n

(8/7)^Z = n

You want to solve for Z.

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I tried doing this (7/8)^Z = 1/n and took log as you said whose base is 7/8 which gave me Z = log base 7/8 (1/n) and substituted this in the geometric series summation formula as T(n) = 2n * 8(1-(1/n)) which gives O(n^2) ... not sure whether it is correct. –  Tasbeer Jan 13 '10 at 0:37
    
Logartihms are not necessary to solve this problem; I can't think of an approach where they naturally come up. –  Jason Jan 13 '10 at 0:46
    
As the other poster said, ust let it run to infinity ... –  Hamish Grubijan Jan 13 '10 at 1:15

What you got there in the last line is a geometric series and there is a formula to simplify such a sum.

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