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I'm fairly new to UI programming on the Mac and iPhone, and I've run across something that somewhat puzzles me.

A UIViewController has 3 methods that involve the initialization of it and its view:

  1. init (and init-like methods)
  2. loadView
  3. viewDidLoad (delegate method)

I'd expect these to occur in the order above. First UIViewController is alloc'ed by some other object, then init is immediately called (or some other init method, like initWithStyle).

Only once the object is initialized would I expect it to call its own loadView function, after which the view, once loaded, calls the viewDidLoad delegate method.

This doesn't happen, for instance:

@implementation UIViewControllerSubclass

- (id)init {
        NSLog(@"0");
    if (self = [super init]) {
        NSLog(@"1");
    }
    return self;
}

- (void)loadView {
    [super loadView];
    NSLog(@"2");
}

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    NSLog(@"3");
}

@end

Produces the console output:

0
2
3
1

The loadView and viewDidLoad methods, therefore, cannot make delegate calls, as the delegate is usually set after the call to [super init], which (as shown above) is called after loadView and viewDidLoad have run:

UIViewControllerSubClass *someViewController = [[UIViewControllerSubclass alloc] init];
[viewController setDelegate:self];

If I want to run code that sets up the ViewController in some way, notifying the delegate as it goes, should the code reside in the init method? Isn't the reason for loadView existing to allow such code to be run at the appropriate moment?

It looks to me like I'll have to create a new initWithDelegate method which sets the delegate ivar before calling [super init], is this right, or am I going about this the wrong way?

Thanks in advance :)

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6 Answers 6

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The view loading system on the iPhone works like this:

When you initialize a view controller (either with -init or -initWithNibName:bundle:), it doesn't actually create and initialize the view. When you call -view for the first time, it calls -loadView. By default, -loadView just loads the view from the xib file (nibName). If you override this, though, you're responsible for creating the view and assigning it to the view controller's view property. As an example:

- (void)loadView
{
   UIView *view = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:[[UIScreen mainScreen] applicationFrame]];
   // add subviews 
   self.view = view;
   [view release];
}

Every time you create the view, which is different from the view becoming visible and showing onscreen, it calls -viewDidLoad. (-viewDidAppear/-viewDidDisappear is for the visibility of the view on-screen)

Since we're already off-track, let's consider memory management. When the view is offscreen, the system will automatically set the view property of a view controller to nil. The problem is that all the subviews of that view are leaking. How so? Well, the retain count for each subview is 2 (views retain subviews, and your view controller has an outlet/ivar to it). When the view is nil, the retain count of that view is 1. It doesn't make sense for a view to stick around if a view isn't showing, so you set it to nil in -viewDidUnload (which is a hook for whenever the view is set to nil).

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Note: viewDidUnload is deprecated as of iOS 6.0. –  Brainware Aug 24 '13 at 1:36

The initWithNibName:bundle: method is the designated initializer for the UIViewController class.

Try overriding and using it instead of init:

- (id)initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibNameOrNil bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundleOrNil {
    if (self = [super initWithNibName:nibNameOrNil bundle:nibBundleOrNil]) {
    }
    return self;
}

...

UIViewControllerSubClass *someViewController = [[UIViewControllerSubclass alloc] initWithNibName:@"UIViewControllerSubclass" bundle:nil];
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1  
Hm.. When I try to run it in 5.1 Simulator, the debugger isn't reaching either -[MyViewController initWithNibName:bundle:] or -[MyViewController init] –  Ivan Balashov Jul 20 '12 at 8:04
    
this is where you initialise the UIViewController, as such, but not where you fool with the view. –  Joe Blow Jun 23 at 9:57
-(void)awakeFromNib
{
}

is only called if you are using story board to store the ViewController drawn in story board Nib---means interface bundle.

the proper sequence is

-(void)initWithCoder
-(void)awakefromNib    //(if story board is used)
    or
-(void)loadView----() //if manually generating the view contoller

-(void)viewDidLoad-----(called only once in the life cycle of viewController)
-(void)viewWillAppear
-(void)viewDidAppear

While moving to a new ViewController

-(void)viewWillDisappear
-(void)viewDidDisappear

While returning to the first ViewController

-(void)viewWillAppear
-(void)viewDidAppear
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loadView is also called if a story board is used –  malcolmhall Nov 10 '13 at 19:30

I've come to this page a few dozen times, yet only after many months did I understand the answer wonderfully provided by Saurabh Sharan. I've attached a test case .m file that may help others who are looking for clarification.

//
//  RJViewController.m
//  Initialization And View Load Study
//
//  Created by Kevin Muldoon on 2/23/13.
//  Copyright (c) 2013 Kevin Muldoon. All rights reserved.
//

#import "RJViewController.h"
#import "RJModel.h"

static NSString *kDataSource = @"dataSource";
static NSString *kNotificationWhatever = @"notificationWhatever";

@interface RJViewController ()

@end

@implementation RJViewController

- (id)initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibNameOrNil bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundleOrNil {
    self = [super initWithNibName:nibNameOrNil bundle:nibBundleOrNil];
    if (self) {
        // Custom initialization
        //
        // Whatever you do, DON'T do anything with self.view property here because
        // your init order will be out of sync with what you expect. Furthermore,
        // the calling object shouldn't modify self.view property until AFTER it's been
        // presented in a method such as [self.navigationController pushViewController:viewController animated:YES];
        //

        // init'ing properties is fine...
        //
        self.logging = YES;
        self.model = [[RJModel alloc] init];

        // However, modifying self.view.backgroundColor in initWithNibName is NOT OK!
        // If you doubt, uncomment the line self.view.backgroundColor to see
        // your load order change from initWithNibName, loadView, viewDidLoad 
        // to loadView, viewDidLoad, initWithNibName
        //
//        self.view.backgroundColor = [UIColor blueColor];

    }
    if (self.logging) NSLog(@"%@ %@", NSStringFromClass([self class]), NSStringFromSelector(_cmd));
    return self;
}

- (void)loadView {
    [super loadView];
    // Do any additional setup before loading the view from its nib.
    //
    // loadView is a WONDERFUL place to put all addObservers and NSNotification 
    // listeners provided you are not messing around with the init and load orders  
    // by premeturely calling methods on the self.view property!
    //
    // Do remember to add [super loadView] as above or you're going to have problems!
    // Apple docs recommends NOT overriding loadView, therefore, we always call
    // [super loadView] before we register our observers and notification listeners.
    //
    // It is very good to put your observers and NSNotification listeners in loadView
    // because you can easily see them and then check that your dealloc method removes them.
    // 

    [self.model addObserver:self forKeyPath:kDataSource options:NSKeyValueObservingOptionNew context:nil];
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(receivedNotificationWhatever:)name:kNotificationWhatever object:nil];

    if (self.logging) NSLog(@"%@ %@", NSStringFromClass([self class]), NSStringFromSelector(_cmd));
}

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    // Do any additional setup after loading the view from its nib.

    self.title = @"Hello";
    self.view.backgroundColor = [UIColor blueColor];
    [self.model fetchDataForDataSource];

    if (self.logging) NSLog(@"%@ %@", NSStringFromClass([self class]), NSStringFromSelector(_cmd));
}

- (void)didReceiveMemoryWarning {
    [super didReceiveMemoryWarning];
    // Dispose of any resources that can be recreated.
}

- (void)dealloc {

    [self.model removeObserver:self forKeyPath:kDataSource];
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] removeObserver:self];

    NSLog(@"%@ %@", NSStringFromClass([self class]), NSStringFromSelector(_cmd));

}

- (void)receivedNotificationWhatever:(NSNotification *)notification {
    // Do something awesome with this new notification!

    if (self.logging) NSLog(@"%@ %@ - %@", NSStringFromClass([self class]), NSStringFromSelector(_cmd), notification);

}

- (void)observeValueForKeyPath:(NSString *)keyPath ofObject:(id)object change:(NSDictionary *)change context:(void *)context {
    // Do something with this awesome new observed value!

    if ( (object = self.model) && [keyPath isEqualToString:kDataSource]) {
        if (self.logging) NSLog(@"%@ %@ - %@", NSStringFromClass([self class]), NSStringFromSelector(_cmd), object);        
    }

}

@end
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gerry3 is right. This stuff still confuses me too. Check out the docs on designated initializers: http://developer.apple.com/iphone/library/documentation/cocoa/conceptual/ObjectiveC/Articles/ocAllocInit.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30001163-CH22-SW8

Also note that if your controller is created by a nib being loaded then only initWithCoder will get called. loadView doesn't get called in that case either.

Because of this it seems like most of the code I've seen does most initialization in stuff like viewDidLoad even though that seems wrong, but it seems to be the best method that gets called in both cases where something is loaded in a nib and created programmatically.

But the reason this seems out of order is that the [super init] is calling loadView etc. –

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"most of the code I've seen does most initialization in stuff like viewDidLoad even though that seems wrong" Actually it is wrong. The reason for that is that your view might be unloaded while your viewcontroller would still be around, ready to load again the view on demand. You therefore risk to re-initialize your variables and in some cases that might lead to hard-to-track logical problems in your app. –  KPM Mar 13 '12 at 21:02

Taking @Nimrod's suggestion I did something like:

-(void)viewDidLoad
{
    // Init code here
}

I don't know if this can cause issues with memory leaking but looking at Apple's docs it doesn't seem to create any cycle:

view lifecycle

This was taken from: http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#featuredarticles/ViewControllerPGforiPhoneOS/ViewLoadingandUnloading/ViewLoadingandUnloading.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40007457-CH10-SW1

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