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What is a good approach to pass setting to AngularJS app?

Technology stack:

  • Node.js
  • AngularJS

Settings look like this:

window.settings = {};
settings.webSocketURL = 'ws://domain.com/websocket';
settings.webSocketTopic = 'name';

Here are few options:

  1. Include script <script src="scripts/settings.js"></script>

    Disadvantages: settings.js file is in scripts directory and not the root directory, additional script to load.

  2. Include script like in 1 but settings.js is generated by Node.js.

    Disadvantage: additional script to load.

  3. Embed setting directly into HTML.

    Disadvantage: need to use templating like EJS instead of HTML.

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3 Answers 3

I had a similar problem, and I solved using the config:

myapp
.constant("settings", {
  "webSocketURL": 'ws://domain.com/websocket',
  "webSocketTopic": "name"
})

then in your controllers you just have to inject the settings, and get them for example with settings.webSocketURL

share|improve this answer
    
That is good AngularJS way of defining settings, but it's not user-friendly for modifications by end-user. Ideally there should be settings file in the root web app folder that is modified according to user specific environment. –  webdev Dec 12 '13 at 6:27
    
In that case you can consider using factories: this is a good example, is about page titles, but can easily adapted to your needs: maurizionapoleoni.de/blog/… –  john locke Dec 12 '13 at 6:32
    
Yes. It makes sense to wrap setting into a provider, but the question is what is a good way to load data and may not be AngularJS specific question. I have config.js file that is used by Node.js application. Ideally I would want to make part of it (client-side settings) make available to AngularJS. –  webdev Dec 12 '13 at 7:13
    
So far I'm leaning to my option 2. unless there is better solution. –  webdev Dec 12 '13 at 7:16

I suppose you could create a config module anywhere you want

// config/app.coffee
angular.module('MyAppConfig', [])
  .config ($provide) ->
    $provide.constant 'webSocketURL', 'ws://domain.com/websocket'
    $provide.constant 'webSocketTopic', 'name'

And use a Grunt task, or script or whatever to concatenate it with your application script.

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I'm using Grunt to build distribution (dist folder). Preferable way is not to use any concatenation for this. This settings file should be modified by the end-user who runs web application on user specific environment (user may not have grunt installed). –  webdev Dec 12 '13 at 6:24
    
Ok, I guess I misunderstood your question. Those settings are meant to be changed by a potential end-user of the application? If so, I think it really depends of the use case. How will the application be distributed, and how is it supposed to be deployed (just by opening the browser, running a local server, or uploading it to a "normal" server)? –  Daniel Perez Dec 12 '13 at 6:50
    
I have config.js file that is used by Node.js application, app.js has var config = require('./config'); Ideally I would want to make part of it (client-side settings) make available to AngularJS. –  webdev Dec 12 '13 at 7:13
    
So far I'm leaning to my option 2. unless there is better solution. –  webdev Dec 12 '13 at 7:17

Here is my solution:

  • Put client settings in server config.

    config.settings = {};

  • Generate JS file with Node.js

    app.get('/settings.js', function(req, res) {
        res.setHeader('Content-Type', 'application/javascript');
        res.setHeader('Cache-Control', 'no-cache, no-store, must-revalidate');
        res.setHeader('Pragma', 'no-cache');
        res.setHeader('Expires', 0);

        res.send('window.settings = ' + JSON.stringify(config.settings) + ';');
    });

  • Define AngularJS constant

    ngular.module('app')
        .constant('settings', window.settings)

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