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I'm just starting to learn object oriented programming in C++ and am having issues figuring out how to print an object that is stored inside an array. From what I know, I want to just try to try and go through the array and print out each employee object, how because objects are different than variables like int and double I'm sure it's causing a problem. Is my logic wrong, or is it just syntax? Here is my code:

Header:

#ifndef EMPLOYEE_H
#define EMPLOYEE_H
#include <string>
using namespace std;

class Employee
{
private:
    string name;
    string idNumber;
    string department;
    string position;
    int yearsWorked;

public:
    Employee();
    Employee(string, string);
    Employee(string, string, string, string, int);
    void setName(string);
    void setIdNumber(string);
    void setDepartment(string);
    void setPosition(string);
    bool setYearsWorked(int);
    string getName()const;
    string getIdNumber()const;
    string getDepartment()const;
    string getPosition()const;
    int getYearsWorked()const;
};

#endif

Implementation:

#include "Employee.h"
using namespace std;

Employee::Employee()
{
    string name = "";
    string idNumber = "";
    string department = "";
    string position = "";
    int yearsWorked = 0;
}

Employee::Employee(string nm, string id)
{
    string name = nm;
    string idNumber = id;
    string department = "";
    string position = "";
    int yearsWorked = 0;
}

Employee::Employee(string nm, string id, string dpt, string pos, int years)
{
    string name = nm;
    string idNumber = id;
    string department = dpt;
    string position = pos;
    int yearsWorked = years;
}

void Employee::setName(string nm)
{
    name = nm;
}

void Employee::setIdNumber(string id)
{
    idNumber = id;
}

void Employee::setDepartment(string dpt)
{
    department = dpt;
}

void Employee::setPosition(string pos)
{
    position = pos;
}

bool Employee::setYearsWorked(int years)
{
    if (years >= 0)
    {
        yearsWorked = years;
        return true;
    }
    else
        return false;
}

string Employee::getName()const
{
    return name;
}

string Employee::getIdNumber()const
{
    return idNumber;
}

string Employee::getDepartment()const
{
    return department;
}

string Employee::getPosition()const
{
    return position;
}

int Employee::getYearsWorked()const
{
    return yearsWorked;
}

Main:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include "Employee.h"
using namespace std;

const int SIZE = 3;

int main()
{
    Employee emp1("Jenny Jacobs", "JJ8990", "Accounting", "President", 15);
    Employee emp2("Myron Smith", "MS7571", "IT", "Programmer", 5);
    Employee emp3("Chris Raines", "CR6873", "Manufacturing", "Engineer", 30);
    Employee employees[SIZE] = {emp1, emp2, emp3};

    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; i++)
    {
        cout << employees[i] << endl;
    }

    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Please, for the sake of everyone who will ever use your headers, don't pollute their code with the entire std namespace. – chris Dec 12 '13 at 7:47
1  
did you try overload << operator ? – Nik Dec 12 '13 at 7:47
    
which line or lines give you error? – Kick Buttowski Dec 12 '13 at 7:47
    
@Nik he probably doesn't know about it. There's an answer already – Alec Teal Dec 12 '13 at 7:49
    
Once you implement Alf's answer, additionally you can used std::copy to print the array of employees instead of iterating through them using for. – legends2k Dec 12 '13 at 8:15

Add this:

std::ostream& operator<<( std::ostream& stream, Employee const& emp )
{
    return (stream << emp.getName());
}

Modify as needed.


General comments:

  • Do not place using namespace std; in the global namespace in a header. Keep in mind that the standard library defines very common names like distance. Which can easily lead to name collisions.

  • Reserve ALL UPPERCASE names for macros, to reduce the chance of name collisions and inadvertent text substitution.

  • Preferentially pass potentially "large" objects, such as std::string, by reference, e.g. formal argument type std::string const&, in order to avoid excessive copying. There are some exceptions to this rule when one aims for perfect code, e.g. for C++11 move semantics, but it's a good general rule.

share|improve this answer

employees[i] is of type Employee. So either you have to print like

cout<<employees[i].getName(); // so on

Or you have to overload << operator for Employee type:

ostream& operator<<(ostream& stream, Employee const& emp );

Firstly. in my machine it compiles fine
Secondly, you are doing:

string name = nm;

So name is a automatic variable, Not the member of your class. You should do like:

  name = nm; // if you delete int name; line

Or,

 this->name = nm;
share|improve this answer
    
The first has an access level conflict. – chris Dec 12 '13 at 7:50
    
@chris made an edit. I think this is okey. – deeiip Dec 12 '13 at 7:53
    
@deeiip I tried the first method and am getting an error Error 1 error C3867: 'Employee::getName': function call missing argument list; use '&Employee::getName' to create a pointer to member – user2875331 Dec 12 '13 at 8:00

Some changes of your code:

Employee::Employee() 
    : yearsWorked( 0 )
{
}

Employee::Employee(string nm, string id) 
    : name( nm ), idNumber( id ), yearsWorked( 0 )
{
}

Employee::Employee(string nm, string id) 
    : name( nm ), idNumber( id ), department( dpt ), position( pos ), yearsWorked( years ), 
{
}

std::ostream & operator <<( std::ostream &os, const Employee &emp )
{
    return ( os << "ID: " << emp.idNumber << ", name: " << emp.name 
                << ", department: " << emp.department << ", position: " << emp.position
                << ", years worked: " << emp.yearsWorked );
}
share|improve this answer

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