Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I tried doing this in C:

    int val = 0xCAFE;
int uc = val & 14;


if (val & 15 == 15 || val & 7 == 7 || val & 11 == 11|| val & 13 == 13 || val & 14 == 14){
    printf("asdjfkadscjas \n");
}

However this is not printing the random string as it should. It worked for 15,7,11,13 tho.

If anyone knows of a better way that would be helpful. I am bad with bitwise operator.

Thanks

share|improve this question

12 Answers 12

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Alternative solution: You can put all your numbers into a binary-coded lookup table:

int AtleastThreeBits (int a)
{
  return (0xe880>>(a&15))&1;
}

Each bit of the magic number represents an answer. In the constant 0xe880 bits 7,11,13,14 and 15 are set. You select the correct bit using a shift and mask it out.

It's not as readable as your solution but faster..

share|improve this answer
3  
I don't normally upvote "clever" answers since I prefer readability but I'll give you one for cleverness this time - this may be handy for embedded systems. – paxdiablo Jan 13 '10 at 4:19
    
Very clever! +1. – j_random_hacker Jan 13 '10 at 4:33
    
Very clever indeed - I'm with paxdiablo on this one. I did a quick look at what MSVC in an optimized compile does to several of the answers here and this boils down to 4 instructions. The clear winner in size and almost certainly execution time. Just don't ask me to maintain more than a little bit of code like this, please. – Michael Burr Jan 13 '10 at 5:42
    
can someone explain this? In the constant 0xe880 bits 7,11,13,14 and 15 are set. – SuperString Jan 13 '10 at 14:49
1  
The magic number will be shifted by the number represented by your nibble. For each combination with 3 bits (111=7; 1011=11; 1101=13; 1110=14; 1111=15) we set the bit in our number giving 11101 000 1000 0000=0xe880. It's a lookup table so small it fits in a 16bit variable. – Patrick Schlüter Jan 13 '10 at 17:21

You're having an operator precedence problem, not an operation problem. == is of higher precedence than &:

if ((val & 15) == 15 || (val & 7) == 7 || ...

Also, you don't need to check for 15.

share|improve this answer
    
why no check for 15? – SuperString Jan 13 '10 at 3:32
2  
Because if all 4 bits are set then 3 are definitely set, and the four checks for 3 bits will catch it. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 13 '10 at 3:35
    
15 includes all four bits, so it will be picked up by a following test (i.e. 7). – dreamlax Jan 13 '10 at 3:36
2  
Precedence rule #1: multiplication and division before addition and subtraction. Everything else gets parens. While I may not follow this rule of thumb 100% of the time, I do generally follow it. What's the point of memorizing the precedence of all those damn operators, just so it can bite me in the ass when I don't get it right? – Michael Burr Jan 13 '10 at 5:59
if (((value & 1 ? 1 : 0) +
     (value & 2 ? 1 : 0) +
     (value & 4 ? 1 : 0) +
     (value & 8 ? 1 : 0)) >=3)
share|improve this answer

You could try a look-up table! Then you could change your threshold easily.

static int nibbleCounts[] = { 0, 1, 1, 2,
                              1, 2, 2, 3,
                              1, 2, 2, 3,
                              2, 3, 3, 4 };
if (nibbleCounts[value & 0xF] >= 3)
    puts ("Hello!");
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the space/speed trade-off but I fixed it from '=>' to '>='. – paxdiablo Jan 13 '10 at 4:17
    
Of course, if you didn't want to make the threshold configurable, you could just lookup a true/false value for a small (possible) performance increase. – paxdiablo Jan 13 '10 at 4:24
    
Yes, you're quite right, a simple test is probably quicker than a compare. – dreamlax Jan 13 '10 at 4:31
    
@pax, I only just noticed you changed it to static too! Perhaps a const qualifier may make things even easier for the optimiser? – dreamlax Jan 13 '10 at 5:02
    
@dreamlax: const generally doesn't help with optimization, but since the nibbleCounts array isn't intended to be modified (and things would break if it were modified), it wouldn't hurt to make it const so someone is less likely to decide to add code later that happens to modify it for whatever reason. – Michael Burr Jan 13 '10 at 6:48

You can use the carry from an addition to "fill in" the 1st 0-bit "hole" in a number. We allow at most one of these in the bottom nibble, so combining the original value and the "filled-in" version with | will produce a bottom nibble with all 1-bits in this case:

if (((val | (val + 1)) & 15) == 15)

I think this has the fewest operations of any (lookup-table-free) solution so far -- no, actually Nils Pipenbrinck's clever "in-place lookup table" has even fewer!

share|improve this answer
    
This one is equally as clever as Nils Pipenbrinck's (in my opinion)! I like it. – dreamlax Jan 13 '10 at 4:57
    
can someone explain how this works? – SuperString Jan 13 '10 at 14:47
    
@SuperString: When you add 1 to a number in binary, notice that the rightmost 0 bit always becomes a 1 due to carry (and any 1-bits to the right of it become 0). If you take this new value and OR it with the original value, what you now have is the same value as previously, except with the rightmost 0-bit now set to 1. Now, if 3 or more of the rightmost 4 bits of the original value are already 1, then setting the rightmost 0-bit to 1 means that all 4 rightmost bits are now 1 -- so when discarding all higher bits (with & 15) the result will now be equal to 15. – j_random_hacker Jan 13 '10 at 16:12

The comparison operator has precedence to the bitwise and operator, so put parens around the & operator:

if( (val & 15) == 15 || (val & 14) == 14 || ... ) {
    printf( "random string...\n" );
}
share|improve this answer
    
By quotes I think you mean brackets :) – dreamlax Jan 13 '10 at 4:07
    
Yes, true, fixed it :) – Frunsi Jan 13 '10 at 4:09
1  
Actually, those are parentheses. Braces are: {}, Brackets are [] and parentheses are (). – Jerry Coffin Jan 13 '10 at 4:48
    
@Jerry: Where I come from, brackets are (), square brackets are [], and curly brackets are {}. They're all brackets. – dreamlax Jan 13 '10 at 4:50
    
@dreamlax - Jerry's terminology (or maybe 'parens' instead of 'parentheses') is what's generally used when discussing the C/C++ language (and it's the terminology used in the language standards). Your definitions might be acceptable when talking about punctuation in general, but when discussing the C language it would be quite confusing to refer to parentheses as 'brackets'. The "curly brackets" term would probably cause little or no confusion. – Michael Burr Jan 13 '10 at 6:17

A simple way to do this, which also shows your intent clearly, would be:

if (!!(val & 0x01) + !!(val & 0x02) + !!(val & 0x04) + !!(val & 0x08) >= 3)
share|improve this answer
    
I like this for clarity. – j_random_hacker Jan 13 '10 at 4:42
    
It's clear as long as you understand the meaning and outcome of the double bang. – dreamlax Jan 13 '10 at 5:03
    
Maybe a quadruple bang would be clearer? :-P – j_random_hacker Jan 13 '10 at 16:22
int x = val & 0x0f;    // mask to keep only the interesting bits

switch (x) {
    case  7:  // 0b0111 ==  7
    case 11:  // 0b1011 == 11
    case 13:  // 0b1101 == 13
    case 14:  // 0b1110 == 14
    case 15:  // 0b1111 == 15
        // at least 3 bits are set
        // do whatever you need, like

        printf("asdjfkadscjas \n");
        break;
}

It's not particularly clever, but I think the next pinhead that comes along and looks at the code will have no problem figuring out what the intent is and whether or not it's correct. And that's a really big plus when that pinhead is me trying to figure out what the hell I did in that function last week.

share|improve this answer
    
Some compilers warn about no default case when the warning settings a high enough, but this much nicer looking than a lengthy chained if statement. – dreamlax Jan 13 '10 at 5:01
    
If your compiler or coding standard wants or needs a default case, just drop it in. The biggest drawback to this in my opinion is that it can't be used in an expression directly. You'd need to go through the trouble of wrapping it in a function, which has a good chance of being more trouble than it's worth. – Michael Burr Jan 13 '10 at 5:05

Psuedocode:

int set = 0;
for(i = 0 to 3)
    set++ if val & (1<<i)
if(set >= 3)
    ...
share|improve this answer
unsigned nNumOfBitEnabled=0;
    for(unsigned nBit=0; nBit<4; ++nBit)
    {
        // Check bit state
        if ((val >> nBit) & 0x1)
        {
            ++nNumOfBitEnabled;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
count  =  (val >> 1) & 1 + (val >> 2)&1 + (val >> 3)&1 + (val&1)

or

count  =  precalculated_counts[val & 0x0F];
share|improve this answer
    
woops, just a sec, not quite correct yet – Keith Nicholas Jan 13 '10 at 3:25
    
Needs some ampersands. – Anon. Jan 13 '10 at 3:25

Interesting tangent to this question - I think I know a sort of clever answer to the question "How many bits are set in this value"

#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdio.h>

uint8_t NumBitsSet(uint32_t value){
   uint8_t num_bits_set = 0;
   while(value != 0){
     value = value & (value-1);
     num_bits_set++;
   }

   return num_bits_set;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
  uint32_t value = 2147483648;
  printf("numbits set in %x = %d", value, NumBitsSet(value));
  return 0;
}

You can use this as a basis for determining if exactly one bit is set, though you have to make a special check for zero.

uint8_t exactly_one_bit_set = (value & (value-1)) == 0 ? 1 : 0;

The trick here is that if a value has one bit set then one less than that value will have all the bits below that bit set and that bit cleared. and-ing those two things together will be always be zero.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.