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I was wondering if any of the modern browsers actually cache the embedded images -- base64 strings, or not?

Also is that a possibility in the near future? based on the official documents by either W3C or major browsers.

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As I understand it, if the base64 string is part of the HTML document (inline) then it will both have to be downloaded and parsed as an image each time the document is downloaded. If it is a background image in an external CSS file then it can be cached with the CSS file, but will still need to be parsed with every request. I have also read that base64 encoding adds circa 30% overhead on top of the image bytes, but this can largely be negated by gzipping. –  pwdst Dec 12 '13 at 12:32
    
@pwdst Thanks, I was reading and I'm in the same page as well. If you post your comment as an answer I'd be happy to upvote it. –  Mahdi Dec 12 '13 at 12:38
    
I have added this as an answer as requested. –  pwdst Dec 12 '13 at 12:42

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I don't think so, because you're missing an Resource Identifier as the key for the cached image. With embedded images you only have the data itself.

Furthermore a potential conditional request for inlined images must be at the level of the HTML document containing it. The inlined image is just data with no additional request. But HTTP does not support something like conditional requests for parts of the data.

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Is there any way to put that there also? as an attribute maybe? –  Mahdi Dec 12 '13 at 11:42
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You mean add a resource identifier? There isn't. As I understand it, the base64 encoded data is treated as part of the resource it's embedded in (e.g. the HTML or CSS file). Obviously if that resource is cached, the data within it will be cached as part of it. –  Olly Hodgson Dec 12 '13 at 12:49
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@OllyHodgson Thanks for the explanation, that make sense. –  Mahdi Dec 12 '13 at 13:35

As I understand it, if the base64 string is part of the HTML document (inline) then it will both have to be downloaded and parsed as an image each time the document is downloaded - there is no way to cache fragments of documents. If it is a background image in an external CSS file then it can be cached with the CSS file, but will still need to be parsed with every request. I have also read that base64 encoding adds circa 30% overhead on top of the image bytes, but this can largely be negated by gzipping.

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