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I have a square matrix with > 1,000 rows & columns. In many fields at the "border" there is nan, for example:

grid = [[nan, nan, nan, nan, nan],
        [nan, nan, nan, nan, nan],
        [nan, nan,   1, nan, nan],
        [nan,   2,   3,   2, nan],
        [  1,   2,   2,   1, nan]]

Now I want to eliminate all rows and columns where I only have nan. This would be the 1. and 2. row and the last column. But I also want to receive a square matrix, so the number of the eliminated rows must be equal to the number of eliminated columns. In this example, I want to get this:

grid = [[nan, nan, nan, nan],
        [nan, nan,   1, nan],
        [nan,   2,   3,   2],
        [  1,   2,   2,   1]]

I'm sure I could solve this with a loop: check every column & row if there is only nan inside and in the end I use numpy.delete to delete the rows & columns I found (but only the minimal number, because of getting a square). But I hope anyone can help me with a better solution or a good library.

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np.isnan() would give you a bool matrix, you can go further from that with some np.all() and np.any() –  Ray Dec 12 '13 at 13:11
    
Try g = np.isnan(grid) then grid[:, ~np.all(g, axis=0)][~np.all(g, axis=1)]. Not sure about your square condition though. It seems there are cases where this may be ambiguous. –  Mr E Dec 12 '13 at 13:14
    
if you want to keep a square, you will sometimes still have rows completely filled with nans? –  usethedeathstar Dec 12 '13 at 13:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This works, zipping the indices of rows\cols is key so they always have the same length, hence preserving the squareness of the matrix.

nans_in_grid = np.isnan(grid)
nan_rows = np.all(nans_in_grid, axis=0)
nan_cols = np.all(nans_in_grid, axis=1)

indicies_to_remove = zip(np.nonzero(nan_rows)[0], np.nonzero(nan_cols)[0])
y_indice_to_remove, x_indice_to_remove = zip(*indicies_to_remove)

tmp = grid[[x for x in range(grid.shape[0]) if x not in x_indice_to_remove], :]
grid = tmp[:, [y for y in range(grid.shape[1]) if y not in y_indice_to_remove]]

Continuing on Mr E, solution, and then padding the results works also.

def pad_to_square(a, pad_value=np.nan):
    m = a.reshape((a.shape[0], -1))
    padded = pad_value * np.ones(2 * [max(m.shape)], dtype=m.dtype)
    padded[0:m.shape[0], 0:m.shape[1]] = m
    return padded

g = np.isnan(grid) 
grid = pad_to_square(grid[:, ~np.all(g, axis=0)][~np.all(g, axis=1)])

Another solution, building on the other answer here. Significantly faster for larger matrixes.

shape = grid.shape[0]

first_col  = (i for i,col in enumerate(grid.T) if np.isfinite(col).any() == True).next()
last_col  = (shape-i-1 for i,col in enumerate(grid.T[::-1]) if np.isfinite(col).any() == True).next()
first_row = (i for i,row in enumerate(grid) if np.isfinite(row).any() == True).next()
last_row  = (shape-i-1 for i,row in enumerate(grid[::-1]) if np.isfinite(row).any() == True).next()

row_len = last_row - first_row
col_len = last_col - first_col
delta_len = row_len - col_len
if delta_len == 0:
    pass
elif delta_len < 0:
    first_row = first_row - abs(delta_len)
    if first_row < 0:
        delta_len = first_row
        first_row = 0
        last_row += abs(delta_len)
elif delta_len > 0:
    first_col -= abs(delta_len)
    if first_col < 0:
        delta_len = first_col
        first_col = 0
        last_col += abs(delta_len)

grid =  grid[first_row:last_row+1, first_col:last_col+1]
share|improve this answer
    
Fixed some typos –  M4rtini Dec 12 '13 at 14:15
    
Added another solution –  M4rtini Dec 12 '13 at 16:03
1  
I don't think the padding solution will work if the nan rows/columns are not in the border of the resultin array, but inside. –  Jaime Dec 12 '13 at 16:32
    
ahh, yea that true. It can only be used if the nans's always was at the border. Which i think was implied in the question? And he might even not care where the nan's are placed –  M4rtini Dec 12 '13 at 16:53
    
Another solution, faster for larger arrays. –  M4rtini Dec 12 '13 at 19:05
import numpy as np
nan = np.nan
grid = [[nan, nan, nan, nan, nan],
        [nan, nan, nan, nan, nan],
        [nan, nan,   1, nan, nan],
        [nan,   2,   3,   2, nan],
        [  1,   2,   2,   1, nan]]
g = np.array(grid)
cols = np.isnan(g).all(axis=0)
rows = np.isnan(g).all(axis=1)
first_col = np.where(cols==False)[0][0]
last_col = len(cols) - np.where(cols[::-1]==False)[0][0] -1
first_row = np.where(rows==False)[0][0]
last_row = len(rows) - np.where(rows[::-1]==False)[0][0] -1
row_len = last_row - first_row
col_len = last_col - first_col
delta_len = row_len - col_len
if delta_len == 0:
    pass
elif delta_len < 0:
    first_row = first_row - abs(delta_len)
    if first_row < 0:
        delta_len = first_row
        first_row = 0
        last_row += abs(delta_len)
elif delta_len > 0:
    first_col -= abs(delta_len)
    if first_col < 0:
        delta_len = first_col
        first_col = 0
        last_col += abs(delta_len)
print g[first_row:last_row+1, first_col:last_col+1]

Output:

[[ nan  nan  nan  nan]
 [ nan  nan   1.  nan]
 [ nan   2.   3.   2.]
 [  1.   2.   2.   1.]]
share|improve this answer

Here is a shorter way. It works by scanning the main diagonal, removing row+column which are all nan, and then doing the same for the secondary diagonal:

import numpy as np
nan = np.nan
grid = [[nan, nan, nan, nan, nan],
        [nan, nan, nan, nan, nan],
        [nan, nan,   1, nan, nan],
        [nan,   2,   3,   2, nan],
        [  1,   2,   2,   1, nan]]
g = np.array(grid)
for i in [1, 2]:
    cols = np.isnan(g).all(axis=0)
    rows = np.isnan(g).all(axis=1)
    main_diagonal = np.logical_not(cols & rows)
    ind = np.nonzero(main_diagonal)[0]
    main_diagonal[ind[0]:ind[-1]+1] = True  # do not remove inner row/col
    removed_main_diag = g[main_diagonal][:, main_diagonal]
    g = removed_main_diag[:][::-1]
print g

Output:

[[ nan  nan  nan  nan]
 [ nan  nan   1.  nan]
 [ nan   2.   3.   2.]
 [  1.   2.   2.   1.]]
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