Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to create a stored procedure to insert a new row in a table 'dbo.Terms'

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.terms 
       @Term_en                      NVARCHAR(50)  = NULL   , 
       @Createdate                   DATETIME      = NULL   , 
       @Writer                       NVARCHAR(50)  = NULL   , 
       @Term_Subdomain               NVARCHAR(50)  = NULL  
AS 
BEGIN 
     SET NOCOUNT ON 

     INSERT INTO dbo.terms
          (                    
            Term_en                     ,
            Createdate                  ,
            Writer                      ,
            Term_Subdomain                 
          ) 
     VALUES 
          ( 
            @Term_en    = 'Cat'               ,
            @Createdate   = '2013-12-12'      ,
            @Writer         = 'Fadi'          ,
            @Term_Subdomain = 'English'                    
          ) 

END 

GO

But is shows me an Error here ( @Term_en = 'Cat') incorrect syntax Any help?

share|improve this question
3  
What are you actually trying to do there? –  Martin Smith Dec 12 '13 at 13:24
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I presume you want to insert the values cat etc into the table; to do that you need to use the values from your procedures variables. I wouldn't call your procedure the same name as your table it will get all kinds of confusing; you can find some good resources for naming standards (or crib from Adventureworks)

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.terms 
       @Term_en                      NVARCHAR(50)  = NULL   , 
       @Createdate                   DATETIME      = NULL   , 
       @Writer                       NVARCHAR(50)  = NULL   , 
       @Term_Subdomain               NVARCHAR(50)  = NULL  
AS 
BEGIN 
     SET NOCOUNT ON 

     INSERT INTO dbo.terms
          (                    
            Term_en                     ,
            Createdate                  ,
            Writer                      ,
            Term_Subdomain                 
          ) 
     VALUES 
          ( 
            @Term_en,
            @Createdate,
            @Writer,
            @Term_Subdomain
          ) 

END 

GO

And to test it

exec dbo.terms 
    @Term_en    = 'Cat'               ,
    @Createdate   = '2013-12-12'      ,
    @Writer         = 'Fadi'          ,
    @Term_Subdomain = 'English' 
share|improve this answer
    
@MartinSmith I think that depends how you call your procedures out of your application, If you are always able to pass all parameters over when you call a procedure then you don't need defaults. If your code calls procedures and sometimes don't have values to pass over for all variables the parameters you do need the null otherwise the procedure will expect you to pas the null into the variable. –  u07ch Dec 12 '13 at 13:50
    
Yes, entirely true. –  Martin Smith Dec 12 '13 at 14:00
    
Thanks a lot, now. can anyone tell me how to create a trigger to add a rows in another table when any new rows has inserted in a table 'dbo.terms'? –  Ameen Chaabani Dec 12 '13 at 14:10
add comment

Here is how to set your defaults for parameters in your proc:

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.terms 
       @Term_en        NVARCHAR(50)  = 'Cat', 
       @Createdate     DATETIME      = '2013-12-12', 
       @Writer         NVARCHAR(50)  = 'Fadi', 
       @Term_Subdomain NVARCHAR(50)  = 'English'
AS 
BEGIN 
     SET NOCOUNT ON 

     INSERT INTO dbo.terms
          (                    
            Term_en                     ,
            Createdate                  ,
            Writer                      ,
            Term_Subdomain                 
          ) 
     VALUES 
          ( 
            @Term_en,
            @Createdate,
            @Writer,
            @Term_Subdomain                    
          ) 

END 

GO
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.