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I have a method which has a game loop:

boolean playing = true; 
while(playing) {} 

in that loop there are around 10 methods which are being called.

The loop is in a run() method of a Thread and there will be around 20 threads running at a time.

Threads will change the playing variable of each other into false.

So:

while (playing) {
   doSomething1();
   doSomething2();
   doSomething3();
   doSomething4();
   doSomething5();
   etc();

}

Without adding, everywhere;

 if (playing) doSomething1(); 

or

 if (!playing) break;

and without calling interrupt on the thread, how can I make run end the moment playing changes from true to false?

I do need to have the contents of the loop run right up to the line when playing changes, so just using something like synchronized won't work.

Or maybe it will and I just don't know about it.

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You should be using volatile I'm thinking. –  crush Dec 12 '13 at 13:50
    
Why do you don't want to interrupt the threads? This is exactly the case interruption mechanism was designed for. –  Jakub Zaverka Dec 12 '13 at 14:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no way to do this other than how you are doing it. Just check playing at suitable moments in the execution flow.

If you think about it anything else is dangerous - only your thread knows when it is safe to stop, as otherwise it may terminate half way through modifying something and leave the change half complete.

One thing you could do to avoid the repeated code is:

public Interface ThreadTask {
    void run();
}

ThreadTask[] tasks;

while (playing) {
   for (ThreadTask tt: tasks) {
       if (!playing) {
           break;
       }
       tt.run();
   }
}

In general though I wouldnt expect your execution of a game loop to take so long that checking for playing more than once each time around the loop to be an issue. Otherwise you will need to break out those long running tasks anyway to keep things responsive.

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Thanks for the quick answer. Do you (or someone) know if there is another language maybe where you can establish this kind of thing (through meta programming)? Like monitor this value and notify me when it changes pausing the current operation of the thread. –  CharlesS Dec 12 '13 at 13:56
    
It's a fundamentally broken thing to do as only the running thread knows when it is safe to pause - what happens if you pause it while its holding locks, while it's half way through making changes, etc. (For example imagine you give gold to someone and after adding it to the target you kill the thread before removing it from the sender). –  Tim B Dec 12 '13 at 13:57
    
I was referring to the running thread. So basically, in psuedocode; playing.onChange(someFunction) and someFunction basically is injected at the point the threaded code was when playing changed. So then you can do whatever you want. Just thinking out loud here. My question is already answered I think, but just waiting for more good ideas. –  CharlesS Dec 12 '13 at 14:15
    
Still the same problem since you don't know what the thread is doing at the point you interrupt it. If you want to inject code into a running thread just have a collection of Runnables and have the thread at a suitable point loop through the collection calling run() then removing the Runnable. –  Tim B Dec 12 '13 at 14:19

Refactor away your list of somethings into an enum:

enum Things {

    Something1 {
                @Override
                void doIt() {

                }
            },
    Something2 {
                @Override
                void doIt() {

                }
            },
    Something3 {
                @Override
                void doIt() {

                }
            };

    abstract void doIt();
}

volatile boolean playing = true;

public void play() {
    while (playing) {
        for (Things it : Things.values()) {
            if (playing) {
                it.doIt();
            } else {
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}

This trick also opens up your play loop for the future when you decide to call Something2 between all other Somethings for example.

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