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Is there a pandas function to transform this data so it show the columns as a,b,c,d,e or whatever is inside the data field and the rows count how many of the letters there are.

from pylab import *
import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

trans=pd.read_table('output.txt', header=None,index_col=0)

print trans
>>> 
        1  2    3    4
0                     
11      a  b    c  NaN
666     a  d    e  NaN
10101   b  c    d  NaN
1010    a  b    c    d
414147  b  c  NaN  NaN
10101   a  b    d  NaN
1242    d  e  NaN  NaN
101     a  b    c    d
411     c  d    e  NaN
444     a  b    c  NaN

instead I want the output to be like this:

        a  b    c     d   e
0                     
11      1  1    1   NaN  NaN
666     1  NaN  NaN   1    1

The function .stack() almost gets it done but in the wrong format.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could also use Pandas get_dummies()

pd.get_dummies(df.unstack().dropna()).groupby(level=1).sum()

results in:

        a  b  c  d  e
0                    
11      1  1  1  0  0
666     1  0  0  1  1
10101   0  1  1  1  0
1010    1  1  1  1  0
414147  0  1  1  0  0
10101   1  1  0  1  0
1242    0  0  0  1  1
101     1  1  1  1  0
411     0  0  1  1  1
444     1  1  1  0  0

You could replace the zeros with NaN's in you want to.

Its a bit obscure in one line. df.unstack().dropna() basically flattens your DataFrame to a series and drops al NaN's. The get_dummies gives a table of all the occurrences of the letters, but for each level in the unstack DataFrame. The grouping and sum then combine the index to the original shape.

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Beautiful. Much better than my (now-deleted) attempt to make get_dummies work on a DataFrame. Really like the unstack().dropna() idiom. –  Dan Allan Dec 12 '13 at 14:41
    
I noticed, you could have left it, no harm in having some options. I still agree with your earlier comment that its less pretty (and readable) than the pivot solution from Roman. The concept of pivot is also better known, then ... get_dummies. :) –  Rutger Kassies Dec 12 '13 at 14:46

Something like this may be:

>>> st = pd.DataFrame(trans.stack()).reset_index(level=0)
>>> st.columns = ['i','c']
>>> st.pivot_table(rows='i', cols='c', aggfunc=len)
c        a   b   c   d   e
i                         
11       1   1   1 NaN NaN
101      1   1   1   1 NaN
411    NaN NaN   1   1   1
444      1   1   1 NaN NaN
666      1 NaN NaN   1   1
1010     1   1   1   1 NaN
1242   NaN NaN NaN   1   1
10101    1   2   1   2 NaN
414147 NaN   1   1 NaN NaN
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close but .reset_index(level=0) gives an error ValueError('cannot insert %s, already exists' % item) –  user3084006 Dec 12 '13 at 14:24
1  
what version of pandas do you use? –  Roman Pekar Dec 12 '13 at 14:35
    
I am using version 0.13 development version from 04-Dec-2013 –  user3084006 Dec 12 '13 at 14:39

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