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Let's say I have an array r of dimension (n, m). I would like to shuffle the columns of that array.

If I use numpy.random.shuffle(r) it shuffles the lines. How can I only shuffle the columns? So that the first column become the second one and the third the first, etc, randomly.

Example:

input:

array([[  1,  20, 100],
       [  2,  31, 401],
       [  8,  11, 108]])

output:

array([[  20, 1, 100],
       [  31, 2, 401],
       [  11,  8, 108]])
share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

While asking I thought about maybe I could shuffle the transposed array:

 np.random.shuffle(np.transpose(r))

It looks like it does the job. I'd appreciate comments to know if it's a good way of achieving this.

share|improve this answer
1  
It is. I recommend r.T for transpose, though. – user2357112 Dec 12 '13 at 14:42
    
@user2357112 is r.T the exact same thing as np.transpose(r) but shorter? – Maxime Dec 12 '13 at 14:44
    
Effectively identical. There's a very slight difference for 1-d arrays, but you probably won't be using either T or transpose for 1-d arrays. – user2357112 Dec 12 '13 at 14:46
1  
Since numpy.shuffle shuffles the rows, but taking the transpose of a mtrix, you effectively shuffle the columns. Then you transpose back. – Reti43 Dec 12 '13 at 14:52
2  
@Matt: This is an in-place operation on a view of the original array. It does not create a new, shuffled array, so there's no need to transpose the result. – user2357112 Dec 12 '13 at 15:48

So, one step further from your answer:

Edit: I very easily could be mistaken how this is working, so I'm inserting my understanding of the state of the matrix at each step.

<!-- language: lang-python -->

r == 1 2 3
     4 5 6
     6 7 8

r = np.transpose(r)  

r == 1 4 6
     2 5 7
     3 6 8           # Columns are now rows

np.random.shuffle(r)

r == 2 5 7
     3 6 8 
     1 4 6           # Columns-as-rows are shuffled

r = np.transpose(r)  

r == 2 3 1
     5 6 4
     7 8 6           # Columns are columns again, shuffled.

which would then be back in the proper shape, with the columns rearranged.

The transpose of the transpose of a matrix == that matrix, or, [A^T]^T == A. So, you'd need to do a second transpose after the shuffle (because a transpose is not a shuffle) in order for it to be in its proper shape again.

Edit: The OP's answer skips storing the transpositions and instead lets the shuffle operate on r as if it were.

share|improve this answer
    
np.random.shuffle does not return the array. – Maxime Dec 12 '13 at 14:57
    
So I see, edited. Regardless, the final step is needed to return your matrix to its original shape. – Matt Dec 12 '13 at 15:05
    
@Matt: No, no it's not. transpose returns a view of the original array. Once you shuffle the transposed array, the original is shuffled in the desired manner. There is no need to transpose twice. – user2357112 Dec 12 '13 at 15:50
    
@user2357112 I added a sample matrix to each step to illustrate my thought pattern. It's been a decade since my last linear class, but I'm pretty sure this is what the documentation for np.tranpose and np.random.shuffle indicate is going on. – Matt Dec 12 '13 at 16:40
    
@user2357112 read your comment to the question, got it now, thanks. – Matt Dec 12 '13 at 16:42

For a general axis you could follow the pattern:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> 
>>> a = np.array([[  1,  20, 100, 4],
...               [  2,  31, 401, 5],
...               [  8,  11, 108, 6]])
>>> 
>>> print a[:, np.random.permutation(a.shape[1])]
[[  4   1  20 100]
 [  5   2  31 401]
 [  6   8  11 108]]
>>> 
>>> print a[np.random.permutation(a.shape[0]), :]
[[  1  20 100   4]
 [  2  31 401   5]
 [  8  11 108   6]]
>>> 
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