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I have

class Foo {
....
}

Is there a way for Foo to be able to separate out:

function blah() {
  Foo foo; // on the stack
}

and

function blah() {
  Foo foo* = new Foo(); // on the heap
}

I want Foo to be able to do different things depending on whether it's allocated on the Stack or the Heap.

Edit:

Alof of people have asked me "why do this?"

The answer:

I'm using a ref-counted GC right now. However, I want to have ability to run mark & sweep too. For this, I need to tag a set of "root" pointers -- these are the pointers on the stack. Thus, for each class, I'd like to know whether they're in the stack or in the heap.

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2  
Separate out, as in? Static allocations IMHO are done on the stack, and allocations like 'new' will be done on the Heap. –  Amit Jan 13 '10 at 5:50
3  
Why do you need to tell those apart, whats the use-case? –  Georg Fritzsche Jan 13 '10 at 5:57
4  
can the question just be answered? whether or not the guy knows what he is doing, this might be useful for those of us that do actually need it. –  Matt Joiner Jan 13 '10 at 6:29
1  
Rolls Eyes in dazed confusion :-( –  Loki Astari Jan 13 '10 at 7:17
1  
@Anacrolix; It can't be done portably, it won't tell you anything useful if it could be and if you think you need this you're almost certainly wrong. –  Joe Gauterin Jan 13 '10 at 9:05
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14 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You need to actually ask us the real question :-) It's apparent to you why you think this is necessary but it almost certainly isn't. In fact, it's almost always a bad idea.

Why do you think you need to do this?

I usually find it's because developers want to delete or not delete the object based on where it was allocated but that's something that should usually be left to the client of your code rather than your code itself.


Update:

Apologies, you've probably found one of the few areas in which what you're asking makes sense. Ideally, you'd override all the memory allocation and de-allocation operators to keep track of what is created and removed from the heap.

However, I'm not sure it's a simple matter of intercepting the new/delete for the class since there could be situations where delete is not called and, since mark/sweep relies on a reference count, you need to be able to intercept pointer assignments for it to work correctly.

Have you thought about how you're going to handle that?

The classic example:

myobject *x = new xclass();
x = 0;

will not result in a delete call.

Also, how will you detect the fact that the pointer to one of your instances is on the stack? The interception of new and delete can let you store whether the object itself is stack or heap-based but I'm at a loss as to how you tell where the pointer is going to be assigned to, especially with code like:

myobject *x1 = new xclass();  // yes, calls new.
myobject *x2 = x;             // no, it doesn't.
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2  
In a user-land mark/sweep garbage collector, I would expect that some kind of smart pointer is provided to contain pointers to collectable objects (in effect, this provides accurate marking). Your code snippets are therefore not legitimate, since they reference a gc object using only a non-gc raw pointer. A "compiler-land" implementation might use conservative marking and analyse the stack directly. –  Steve Jessop Jan 13 '10 at 10:59
    
Overloading new is not totally reliable. You could malloc() a buffer and placement new (or just simply cast) that to a class. That would still look like a stack-based class, but it's on the heap. IMO you cannot garbage collect things created with new: you'll need your own allocation and pointer wrappers. –  AshleysBrain Jan 13 '10 at 11:30
    
I plan to use this together with ref-counted smart pointers. That have creation, operator=, and destructor overloaded. The example above would end up being like: MyObject::Ptr x = new MyObject(); x = 0; // overloading of operator = causes x to do a ref decrement, which triggers the destructor. –  anon Jan 13 '10 at 12:16
    
You should try boost::shared_ptr, for a more canonical and tested implementation of reference counting. –  GManNickG Jan 13 '10 at 16:05
1  
@GManNickG or, in C++11, std::shared_ptr which fixed some problems with boost::shared_ptr. –  user1203803 Apr 22 '12 at 14:59
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A hacky way to do it:

struct Detect {
   Detect() {
      int i;
      check(&i);
   }

private:
   void check(int *i) {
      int j;
      if ((i < &j) == ((void*)this < (void*)&j))
         std::cout << "Stack" << std::endl;
      else
         std::cout << "Heap" << std::endl;
   }
};

If the object was created on the stack it must live somewhere in the direction of the outer functions stack variables. The heap usually grows from the other side, so that stack and heap would meet somewhere in the middle.

(There are for sure systems where this wouldn't work)

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2  
Of course, implementation dependent. –  GManNickG Jan 13 '10 at 6:01
    
And not that I would recommend doing this for any real task, just a fun idea that came to mind. –  sth Jan 13 '10 at 6:09
2  
I didn't test it, but this might not work in a multithreaded application. –  Nick Dandoulakis Jan 13 '10 at 6:15
6  
I am also sure he knew that you knew that he knew and was just saying. –  Loki Astari Jan 13 '10 at 8:19
1  
Heh, clever. But yeah, I doubt it'd work in a threaded app. –  jalf Jan 13 '10 at 12:18
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The answer is no, there is no standard/portable way to do this. Hacks involving overloading the new operator tend to have holes. Hacks that depend on checking pointer addresses are OS specific and heap implementation specific, and may change with future versions of the OS. You may be comfortable with that, but I wouldn't build any sort of system around this behavior.

I would start looking at different ways to accomplish your goal - perhaps you can have a totally different type to serve as the "root" in your scheme, or require the users to (properly) annotate the stack allocated types as such with a special constructor.

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Is the new hack unreliability: how do you know if the placement new invoked will place the object on the stack or the heap ? –  Matthieu M. Jan 13 '10 at 19:30
    
Question is "how" to do it, not "how to do it standardly/portably". –  Justicle Feb 12 '10 at 5:07
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A more direct, and less intrusive method would be to look up the pointer in the memory region maps (such as /proc/<pid>/maps). Each thread has a region allocated to its stack. Static and global variables will live in the .bss section, constants in a rodata or const segment, and so on.

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I am not positive what you are asking, but overriding the new operator may be what you are trying to do. As the only safe way to create an object on the heap in C++ is to use the new operator, you can differentiate between objects that exist on the heap versus other forms of memory. Google "overloading new in c++" for more information.

You should, however, consider if differentiating between the two types of memory is really necessary from inside the class. Having an object behave differently depending upon where it is stored sounds like a recipe for disaster if you are not careful!

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Not necessarily true. Consider a vector of these objects. The data for vector may have been allocated from the heap, but the object never had new called on it. –  GManNickG Jan 13 '10 at 5:56
    
Constructing objects in a vector calls placement new to construct the object. Now I'm not sure if that means you also need to provide a placement new or not... haven't had to dig that deep before. –  Michael Anderson Jan 13 '10 at 6:08
    
Placement-new cannot be replaced. That said, vector does not use placement-new. (Or containers, for that matter.) They call the construct method of their allocator. (Which typically calls placement-new. :P) –  GManNickG Jan 13 '10 at 6:34
    
Good point about vectors, though I think you mean arrays? Allocation in an array could be prohibited by making the default constructor private, but that's ugly -- especially if the object otherwise doesn't need params in its constructor. –  Dan Breslau Jan 13 '10 at 12:26
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As mentioned above, you need to control how your object is allocated through overloaded new operator. Watch out for two things however, first the 'placement new' operator that initializes your object inside the memory buffer preallocated by user; second, nothing stops the user from simply casting arbitrary memory buffer into your object type:

char buf[0xff]; (Foo*)buf;

Another way is the fact that most runtimes use a bit more memory than asked when doing heap allocations. They usually place some service structure there to identify proper deallocations by pointer. You could inspect your runtime implementation for these patterns, although it will make your code really unportable, dangerous and unsupportable overkill.

Again, as mentioned above, you really are asking for solution details ("how") when you should ask about the initial problem you devised this solution for ("why").

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It is possible if you compare the value of 'this' with the current value of the stack pointer. If this < sp then you have been allocated in the stack.

Try this out (using gcc in x86-64):

#include <iostream>

class A
{
public:
    A()
    {
        int x;

        asm("movq %1, %%rax;"
            "cmpq %%rsp, %%rax;"
            "jbe Heap;"
            "movl $1,%0;"
            "jmp Done;"
            "Heap:"
            "movl $0,%0;"
            "Done:"
            : "=r" (x)
            : "r" (this)
            );

        std::cout << ( x ? " Stack " : " Heap " )  << std::endl; 
    }
};

class B
{
private:
    A a;
};

int main()
{
    A a;
    A *b = new A;
    A c;
    B x;
    B *y = new B;
    return 0;
}

It should output:

Stack 
Heap 
Stack 
Stack 
Heap
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Could you retype this asm() part for VC++? I'm having trouble using it under VS2008. Thanks. –  Aoi Karasu May 31 '10 at 13:35
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Nope, it can't be done reliably or sensibly.

You may be able to detect when an object is allocated with new by overloading new.

But then what if the object is constructed as a class member, and the owning class is allocated on the heap?

Here's a third code example to add to the two you've got:

class blah {
  Foo foo; // on the stack? Heap? Depends on where the 'blah' is allocated.
};

What about static/global objects? How would you tell them apart from stack/heap ones?

You could look at the address of the object, and use that to determine if it is within the range that defines the stack. But the stack may be resized at runtime.

So really, the best answer is that "there's a reason why mark & sweep GC's aren't used with C++". If you want a proper garbage collector, use a different language, one which supports it.

On the other hand, most experienced C++ programmers find that the need for a garbage collector pretty much vanishes when you learn the necessary techniques for resource management (RAII).

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Overload new() for your class. This way you'll be able to tell between heap and stack allocation, but not between stack and static/global.

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This also brings a free pain in the ass when an instance of your class is a non-static member of another class. –  user1203803 Apr 22 '12 at 15:03
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The meta question as asked by pax is asked "why would you want to do that" you'll likely get a more informative answer.

Now assuming you're doing this for "a good reason" (perhaps just curiousity) can get this behaviour by overriding operators new and delete, but don't forget to override all 12 variants including:

new, delete, new no throw, delete no throw, new array, delete array, new array no throw, delete array no throw, placement new, placement delete, placement new array, placement delete array.

One thing you can do is put this in a base class and derive from it.

This is kind of a pain, so what different behavior did you want?

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1  
There is one problem - placement new can be used on memory from the stack and from the heap. How to distinguish this? –  Tadeusz Kopec Jan 13 '10 at 9:15
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I would recommend using smart pointers instead. By design, the class should have data and information about class. Book-keeping tasks should be delegated outside the class.

overloading new and delete can lead to more holes than you can imagine.

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A way for MFC classes:

.H

class CTestNEW : public CObject
{
public:
    bool m_bHasToBeDeleted;
    __declspec(thread) static void* m_lastAllocated;
public:
#ifdef _DEBUG
    static void* operator new(size_t size, LPCSTR file, int line) { return internalNew(size, file, line); }
    static void operator delete(void* pData, LPCSTR file, int line) { internalDelete(pData, file, line); }
#else
    static void* operator new(size_t size) { return internalNew(size); }
    static void operator delete(void* pData) { internalDelete(pData); }
#endif
public:
    CTestNEW();
public:
#ifdef _DEBUG
    static void* internalNew(size_t size, LPCSTR file, int line)
    {
        CTestNEW* ret = (CTestNEW*)::operator new(size, file, line);
        m_lastAllocated = ret;
        return ret;
    }

    static void internalDelete(void* pData, LPCSTR file, int line)
    {
        ::operator delete(pData, file, line);
    }
#else
    static void* internalNew(size_t size)
    {
        CTestNEW* ret = (CTestNEW*)::operator new(size);
        return ret;
    }

    static void internalDelete(void* pData)
    {
        ::operator delete(pData);
    }
#endif
};

.CPP

#include "stdafx.h"
.
.
.
#ifdef _DEBUG
#define new DEBUG_NEW
#endif

void* CTestNEW::m_lastAllocated = NULL;
CTestNEW::CTestNEW()
{
    m_bHasToBeDeleted = (this == m_lastAllocated);
    m_lastAllocated = NULL;
}

HTH, olivier.

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To answer your question, a reliable way (assuming your aplication isn't using more thant one thread), assuming that everithing wich is not contained by your smart pointer isn't on the heap :

-> Overloading new, so that you ca store a list of all blocs allocated, with the size of each block. -> When the constructor of your smart pointer, search in wich block your this pointer belong. If it isn't in any block, you can say it's "on the stack" (actualy, it means it's not managed by you). Otherwise, you know where and when your pointer was allocated (if you wan't to look for orphan pointers and lasily free memory, or things like that..) It do not depend from the architechture.

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Take a look at the program here: http://alumni.cs.ucr.edu/~saha/stuff/memaddr.html. With a few casts, it ouputs:

        Address of main: 0x401090
        Address of afunc: 0x401204
Stack Locations:
        Stack level 1: address of stack_var: 0x28ac34
        Stack level 2: address of stack_var: 0x28ac14
        Start of alloca()'ed array: 0x28ac20
        End of alloca()'ed array: 0x28ac3f
Data Locations:
        Address of data_var: 0x402000
BSS Locations:
        Address of bss_var: 0x403000
Heap Locations:
        Initial end of heap: 0x20050000
        New end of heap: 0x20050020
        Final end of heap: 0x20050010
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