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function move() {

    pos = pos+1;

    t = setTimeout(move, 100); 
}

Can that be called recursive? If yes, could you provide any reference?

Thanks in advance

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Don't put quotes around the function name in setTimeout. It definitely wouldn't be recursive because the function would never be called, just referenced :-) –  Matthew Crumley Jan 13 '10 at 16:16
1  
At best it could be called recurring :) –  Joel Etherton Jan 26 '10 at 3:35
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10 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

No, the difference between recursion (func_a calls func_a) or indirect recursion (func_a calls func_b calls func_a) is that using a timer for repetitive calls will (decoupling) not grow the stack and previous state is lost.

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2  
This is true in tail-recursion in a language that performs tail-call optimization. In Scheme: (define (move) (set! pos (+ pos 1)) (move)) will not grow the stack either, but it certainly seems to be recursive. As I said in my answer, there isn't really a hard line between something that's recursive and something that's not. –  Brian Campbell Jan 13 '10 at 7:25
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No, the function does not call itself. It would be recursive if the function called itself within the body of move.

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Yes it is .. but it can be called as Indirect recursion ..

example for Direct recursion would be something like this:

    function factorial (n)
  {
        if(n==0)
   { 
        return(1);
   }

     return (n * factorial (n-1) ); 
  }

likewise others said .. the function calling itself ..

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setTimeout doesn't call move. It just sets up move to be called when the timeout expires and returns. –  Matthew Crumley Jan 13 '10 at 16:10
    
what Matthew said –  Dan Beam Jan 27 '10 at 8:48
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technically it could be...

function move() {

    var $this = this;

    pos = pos+1;

    t = setTimeout($this, 100);
}

but I see no reason why you'd wanna do this. and if you really wanna get silly (and lock up your browser's thread):

function move() {

    var now = +new Date;

    pos = pos+1;

    while( ( +new Date - now ) <= 100 ){ }

    move( );
}
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+1 thanks, I just put cleaned up example at my post, because I don't want people get attention on unrelated codes. –  YOU Jan 27 '10 at 8:58
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No. Because you cannot "rewind" the local parameters as you return from called instances. Suppose your code was shaped like this:

function move() {
  var l = pos;
  pos = pos + 1;
  if(pos == 100) return;
  setTimeout("move", 100);
  pos = l;
  alert(pos);
}

You wouldn't be able to get a sequential hierarchy here. However if the code was like this,

function move() {
  var l = pos;
  pos = pos + 1;
  if(pos == 100) return;
  move();
  pos = l;
  alert(pos);
}

you could trace your steps back properly and implement logic based on that. Your code is "not-a-real-recursion" because it can be tail-optimized. Any code that can be tail-optimized is not recursive but iterative in nature. Tail recursion is just a different way of writing a loop.

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+1 thanks, that make sense –  YOU Jan 13 '10 at 10:09
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I would call it an inifite loop with a delay.

When the function returns, it does not get back into a previous call instance of itself, hence there is no deep "call stack" as it typically is in recursions.

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What if function contained if(pos==100) dosomething() ? I don't think he's asking it specifically for the given code. –  ssg Jan 13 '10 at 11:32
    
what I see as a typical recursion is when you can say "this task is done when these sub-tasks are done". However, in this case the code performs what it should and then "calls itself", but without subtasking - this is a loop. The code might as well be while(true) {move()} function move(){pos++} –  naivists Jan 13 '10 at 12:53
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It really depends on your definition of recursive, but I would say this is scheduling a callback to be called iteratively, not recursion.

Recursion involves breaking a problem down into smaller, similar problems, until you reach a base case, and then possibly combining the results from those into a solution. There is no "smaller" problem here; it's just scheduling the same callback to happen again after a certain time.

The problem with any sort of hard and fast definition is that recursion can be implemented in terms of iteration, and vice versa.

For instance, is this recursive?

function state1() {
    doSomething();
    return "state2";
}

function state2() {
    doSomethingElse();
    return "state1";
}

var state = "state1";
while (true) {
    if (state == "state1") {
        state = state1();
    } else {
        state = state2();
    }
}

state1 and state1 each cause the other to be called; so in one sense, that's mutual recursion. It's driven by an iterative loop though, so it could also be considered iteration.

In a language that supports tail-call optimization, the same effect could be had by the two functions recursively calling each other (in fact, even in a language without tail-call optimization, you could do it, but you would run out of stack space very quickly):

function state1() {
    doSomething();
    state2();
}

function state2() {
    doSomething();
    state1();
}

So, the question really becomes, how do you distinguish whether something is recursive? Does the fact that one function causes itself to be called again make it recursive?

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2  
I don't think that your example shows recursion, looks like a simple loop with alternating calls. There is no state as it would be required for tree traversal, either your state is on stack or explicit handled. –  stacker Jan 13 '10 at 7:41
1  
In a language with tail-call optimization (such as Scheme), however, they are basically equivalent; the second example would not actually have any state on the stack either, as tail calls allow you to drop the previous stack frame. So, in a language with TCO, does the tail-recursive solution suddenly stop being recursive because it doesn't grow the stack? –  Brian Campbell Jan 13 '10 at 7:48
    
You made me learn about tail-call in my opinion this is unneccesary use of recursion like traversing of a list, if and only if you have no need to come back where you were earlier (this would require the state). BTW the question is tagged as javascript related. –  stacker Jan 13 '10 at 8:24
    
I was not sure it is recursive or not, thats why I only tagged as javascript. thanks a lot for explantions for all anyway. –  YOU Jan 13 '10 at 9:38
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The code in question is not recursion - as the code is being called externally, not as part of a cyclic code-path back to the same method call.

Wikipedia has a great page about recursion here: Wikipedia: Recursion (computer science)

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So, here f1 ("move") is calling f2 ("setTimeout"), which in turn calls f1 again. Hmm.. this is a recursion if f2 is a callback function. But, if f2 is setting some property, like a "timeout". This isn't recursion.

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No. The function is called by an external source (the timer), so it is not recursive.

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2  
No, it sets the timer. And then it exits. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 13 '10 at 7:08
1  
This is definitely not recursive. –  ChaosPandion Jan 13 '10 at 7:11
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