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Here is some code from a C++ book I have been reading showing how to create your own smart pointer:

template <typename T>
class SuperSmartPointer
{
    public:
        explicit SuperSmartPointer(T* inPtr);
        virtual ~SuperSmartPointer();
        SuperSmartPointer(const SuperSmartPointer<T>& src);
        SuperSmartPointer<T>& operator=(const SuperSmartPointer<T>& rhs);
        const T& operator*() const;
        const T* operator->() const;
        T& operator*();
        T* operator->();
        operator void*() const { return mPtr; }
    protected:
        T* mPtr;
        static std::map<T*, int> sRefCountMap;
        void finalizePointer();
        void initPointer(T* inPtr);
};

template <typename T>
std::map<T*, int> SuperSmartPointer<T>::sRefCountMap;

template <typename T>
SuperSmartPointer<T>::SuperSmartPointer(T* inPtr)
{
    initPointer(inPtr);
}

template <typename T> SuperSmartPointer<T>::SuperSmartPointer(const SuperSmartPointer<T>& src)
{
    initPointer(src.mPtr);
}

template <typename T>
SuperSmartPointer<T>& SuperSmartPointer<T>::operator=(const SuperSmartPointer<T>& rhs)
{
    if (this == &rhs) {
        return *this;
    }
    finalizePointer();
    initPointer(rhs.mPtr);
    return *this;
}

template <typename T>
SuperSmartPointer<T>::~SuperSmartPointer()
{
    finalizePointer();
}

template<typename T>
void SuperSmartPointer<T>::initPointer(T* inPtr)
{
    mPtr = inPtr;
    if (sRefCountMap.find(mPtr) == sRefCountMap.end()) {
        sRefCountMap[mPtr] = 1;
    } else {
        sRefCountMap[mPtr]++;
    }
}

template<typename T>
void SuperSmartPointer<T>::finalizePointer()
{
    if (sRefCountMap.find(mPtr) == sRefCountMap.end()) {
        throw std::runtime_error(“ERROR: Missing entry in map!”);
    }
    sRefCountMap[mPtr]--;
    if (sRefCountMap[mPtr] == 0) {
        // No more references to this object--delete it and remove from map
        sRefCountMap.erase(mPtr);
        delete mPtr;
        mPtr = nullptr;
    }
}

template <typename T>
const T* SuperSmartPointer<T>::operator->() const
{
    return mPtr;
}

template <typename T>
const T& SuperSmartPointer<T>::operator*() const
{
    return *mPtr;
}

template <typename T>
T* SuperSmartPointer<T>::operator->()
{
    return mPtr;
}

template <typename T>
T& SuperSmartPointer<T>::operator*()
{
    return *mPtr;
}

My problem with this code/my question is that surely somebody could instantiate an object of this smart pointer class using the new() operator, have the smart pointer on the heap and therefore what would then manage the memory of the shared pointer?? To make this a proper shared pointer should the new() operator be overloaded/prevented?

EDIT: Shouldnt dynamic memory allocation of the custom smart pointer itself be prevented?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

what would then manage the memory of the shared pointer?

The user chose to allocate the smart pointer with new. They have the tools available to them to avoid manual memory management (such as your smart pointer). They chose not to use them, that's not your problem.

Shouldnt dynamic memory allocation of the custom smart pointer itself be prevented?

No, absolutely not. What if a user wants a smart pointer holding a smart pointer, for example? Or any number of other possible scenarios. Again, this is absolutely not your problem, and none of your business if someone wants to use your class this way.

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Ah ok- I see your point. Thanks –  user997112 Dec 12 '13 at 17:29

My problem with this code/my question is that surely somebody could instantiate an object of this smart pointer class using the new() operator, have the smart pointer on the heap and therefore what would then manage the memory of the shared pointer??

Yes, they could, and then they'd have to either manage the shared pointer themselves or have a shared pointer managing the shared pointer!

But this isn't a problem per se; people simply don't do this.

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