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According to the docs, the Android manifest file can have the following syntax for a Service:

<service android:enabled=["true" | "false"]
         android:exported=["true" | "false"]
         android:icon="drawable resource"
         android:isolatedProcess=["true" | "false"]
         android:label="string resource"
         android:name="string"
         android:permission="string"
         android:process="string" >
    . . .
</service>

The permission attribute in particular specifies:

The name of a permission that that an entity must have in order to launch the service or bind to it.

But it seems I cannot request more than one permission for an entity to launch my service. Is that really the case? Is there anyway to circumvent this?

Here on Stackoverflow the closest I found was this answer where the author says that:

An Android Service can have multiple permissions, but permissions are granted at the application level, not at the Service level.

But then he goes on to explain the <uses-permission> attribute which is not what I'm looking for. Another answer reduces my hopes even further. It seems this is indeed not possible.

If that is the case, the alternative I'm considering is to have one service for each permission I require and make them all work as forwarders to the actual service in charge of doing the job. Any better idea?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is that really the case?

In terms of automatic protection in the manifest, yes. That's the 99.9% case.

Is there anyway to circumvent this?

Check for the other permission in Java code, using something like checkCallingPermission().

But then he goes on to explain the attribute which is not what I'm looking for.

Correct.

the alternative I'm considering is to have one service for each permission I require and make them all work as forwarders to the actual service in charge of doing the job.

That would only make sense if you are trying to have a logical OR on the permissions, where the caller has to have permission X or permission Y. Up until this point in your question, I had assumed that you wanted a logical AND on the permissions (caller must hold permission X and permission Y).

I cannot think of a scenario where a logical OR for incoming permissions would be useful, let alone necessary. That being said, your workaround should work if you are using the command pattern with startService(), having the "real" service be not exported, and where you call stopSelf() after forwarding the command on from your exported services. If your vision was to use this proxy approach with the binding pattern, using bindService(), may $DEITY have mercy on your soul, 'cause you're gonna need it.

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