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Primality Check is probably one of "those" tough problems in mathematics. So, whats is the best and fastest algorithm available to check the primality of a huge number. The most crude and the slowest way probably is:

public static bool IsPrime(int i)
{
    for (var x = 2; x < i - 1; i++)
    {
         if (i % x == 0)
         {
             return false;
         }
    }
    return true;
}

Recently I have read that the 768-bit RSA algorithm has been cracked using brute force, using a grid computing array. How do they perform the brute force on a huge prime number? Do each processing unit take up a series of number, factor it and check for primality all the number which lies in that range?

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don't you only need the for loop to go up to half of the number you are tying to find the primality of? e.g if your number was 100, then 50 is the biggest number that could possibly be a factor of it, no? –  darren Jan 13 '10 at 8:22
8  
ceil(sqrt(i)) is the biggest factor you need to check –  swegi Jan 13 '10 at 8:23
1  
maybe i'm being dumb but i'd have thought floor(sqrt(i)) was the biggest factor you needed to check? –  jk. Jan 13 '10 at 9:41
1  
int.MaxValue does not count as a 'huge number' in the field of primality testing. How big are your numbers? –  AakashM Jan 13 '10 at 10:13
2  
You don't strictly speaking need to check any factors in order to determine whether a number is prime. For large numbers that we care about, the elliptic curve primality test is the fastest in practice, and a modified AKS primality test has the lowest provable complexity. I don't think either of them actually produces a factor. The RSA crack does require producing factors, so basically you've asked the wrong question. –  Steve Jessop Jan 13 '10 at 10:48

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Check out primality tests on Wikipedia for pointers to current algorithms

With regard to your naive implementation, do note that you can immediately return false if the number is divisible by 2, allowing you to just check odd numbers. In addition, if you don't find a factor where x <= sqrt(i), it is prime. This is because if you did find a factor larger than sqrt(i), then it must be paired with a factor smaller than sqrt(i). So if you don't find that smaller factor first, you're done.

There's also couple more tricks you can apply to a naive algorithm before you have to go trooping off to http://mathoverflow.net/ for help :)

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Um. Don't go trooping over to mathoverflow.net for help, as this isn't a research/academic topic. (specific questions about a specific primality testing algorithm might be welcome there) –  Jason S Jan 13 '10 at 16:12

Cracking RSA-768 did not directly involve any primality check algorithm, rather what was needed was a factorization algorithm: RSA-768 is the product of two very large primes, and cracking it involves finding these primes.

The factorization algorithm used was Lenstra's Number Field Sieve.

You can read the full article here: Factorization of a 768-bit RSA modulus.

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This should be quite a bit faster:

public static bool IsPrime(int i) {        
    // only go up to the root of i 
    // +1 to be save from floating point rounding errors, ceil should work too.
    var max = sqrt(i) + 1;

    // skip numbers dividable by 2, except 2 itself
    if (i == 2) return true;
    if (i % 2 == 0) return false;
    for (var x = 3; x < max; x+=2)  {
         if (i % x == 0)  {
             return false;
         }
    }
    return true;
}
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I suppose there is some kind of workload distribution, but I doubt that they used such a simple algorithm for the primality test. Maybe they used the number field sieve or Lenstra's elliptic curve factorization.

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Primality testing != factorization.

Breaking a particular RSA public key and retrieving the private key, requires factorization.

The process of constructing an RSA public/private key pair includes primality testing. Most primality testing not used for factorization does not produce a 100% definite answer, but rather it is probabilistic with arbitrarily high probability (more test iterations = higher probability).

And technically you can have a deterministic primality test that is fast and does not involve actually computing any factors of the number in question.

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public static bool IsPrime(int i)
{
    for (var x = 2; x < (i/2); x++)
    {
         if (i % x == 0)
         {
             return false;
         }
    }
    return true;
}
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