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This question is related to : Dependent scope and nested templates, Why do I need to use typedef typename in g++ but not VS? and Nested templates with dependent scope

According to this answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/3311640/1559666 I should add typename to typedef.

The question is - why I getting error?

#include <iostream>

#include <vector>
#include <iterator>


template<typename _Tp, typename _Alloc = std::allocator<_Tp> >
class PtrVector
{
private:
    typedef std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc> VectrorT;
    typedef typename std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc> VT;

public:

    typename std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::const_iterator test(){}
    VT::const_iterator test2(){}    // why there is an error here?

};


int main() {
    return 0;
}

http://ideone.com/ghUQ2b

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marked as duplicate by WhozCraig, Walter, Christopher Creutzig, MattDMo, scrowler Dec 12 '13 at 22:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
You're using reserved identifiers. And you should only have the typename when you have Class<passed in template parameters>::something. The only one of those statements that fits this explicitly is test, but test2 still relies on the template parameters. –  chris Dec 12 '13 at 20:36
    
You'll need typename for e.g. resolving std::vector<_Tp,_Alloc>::iterator but not for type'defing a template class with the appropriately forwarded template parameters. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Dec 12 '13 at 20:41
1  
Because there's no guarantee for the compiler that VT::const_iterator is indeed a type, even if VT is a type, because VT depends on your template parameters. –  yzt Dec 12 '13 at 20:50
    
While you're perusing SO questions and answers, perhaps yo may enjoy this one as well: "Where and why do I have to put the “template” and “typename” keywords?" –  WhozCraig Dec 12 '13 at 20:54
    
@chris Why they reserved? By which point? –  tower120 Dec 12 '13 at 20:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your Ideone sample fixed:

#include <iostream>

#include <vector>
#include <iterator>


template<typename _Tp, typename _Alloc = std::allocator<_Tp> >
class PtrVector
{
private:
    typedef std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc> VectrorT;
    typedef typename std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::const_iterator VTConstIter;
 //         ^^^^^^^^                         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

public:

    typename std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::const_iterator test(){}
 // ^^^^^^^^                         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    VTConstIter test2(){}

};


int main() {
    return 0;
}

As for your comments, see these variants also:

// ...
typedef typename VectrorT::const_iterator VTConstIter; // also works
// ...
typename VectrorT::const_iterator test(){} // also works
// ...

I hope that clarifies abit further what's going on in the compilers guts.

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Thank you. I see know that in all mentioned previously answers was your variant. But why typedef std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc> VectrorT not recognized as a type? –  tower120 Dec 12 '13 at 21:04
    
@tower120 I have extended my answer a bit, VectrorT is recognized as a type, if used correctly ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Dec 12 '13 at 21:15

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