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So, this is kind of an obtuse question, but let me see if I can lay it out relatively simply. Lets say I have the following interface:

public interface IFoo
{
    ICollection<IBar> Bars { get; set; }
}

Which I then implement with:

public class Foo : IFoo
{
    public virtual ICollection<IBar> Bars { get; set; }
}

Only Entity Framework can't work with interfaces, so it pretty much completely ignores this navigation property. In order to get EF to recognize it, I need to change it to:

public virtual ICollection<Bar> Bars { get; set; }

Where Bar would be my implementation of IBar. Only, that fails to implement the interface, which wants IBar not Bar.

Now, consider a slightly different scenario, where I've just got a basic foreign key:

public interface IFoo
{
    IBar Bar { get; set; }
}

public class Foo : IFoo
{
    public virtual IBar Bar { get; set; }
}

Same issue, but here, I can solve it by adding:

public class Foo : IFoo
{
    public virtual Bar Bar { get; set; }
    IBar IFoo.Bar
    {
        get { return Bar; }
        set { Bar = (Bar)value; }
    }
}

EF is happy because it has a concrete type and the interface is happy because it has an implementation with IBar. The problem is that I can't figure out how to apply the same logic with an ICollection<IBar> because (ICollection<Bar>)value raises an exception saying "Cannot implicitly convert type ICollection<Bar> to ICollection<IBar>".

How should I properly make the cast?

UPDATE

So, I wasn't paying close enough attention to where the error was being generated. It was actually complaining about the get { return Bars; } bit. I was able to get rid of the error by changing it to:

public class Foo : IFoo
{
    public virtual ICollection<Bar> Bars { get; set; }
    ICollection<IBar> IFoo.Bars
    {
        get { return (ICollection<IBar>)Enumeration.Cast<IBar>(Bars); }
        set { Bars = (ICollection<Bar>)value; }
    }
}

That seems a little hokey to me though, like I'm only masking the error and creating a little time bomb for myself. I'd appreciate any thoughts or alternate solutions.

share|improve this question
    
I'm curious: What is your situation in which you would need to do this? –  IronMan84 Dec 12 '13 at 21:57
    
I have an entity that implements an interface that only references other interfaces, not concrete types. –  Chris Pratt Dec 12 '13 at 22:00
    
Do your getter and setter actually work? I would expect an InvalidCastException to be thrown for at least some valid collection instances. –  hvd Dec 12 '13 at 22:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To let the covariance/contravariance work I define navigation properties as enumerables in my interfaces:

public interface IFoo
{
    IEnumerable<IBar> Bars { get; }
}

public class Foo : IFoo
{
    public virtual ICollection<Bar> Bars { get; set; }
    IEnumerable<IBar> IFoo.Bars
    {
       return this.Bars;
    } 
}

This is still enough for EF LINQ queries built on interface types.

share|improve this answer
    
Well that makes sense. What about the setter, though? Do you foresee any problems with my set { Bars = (ICollection<Bar>)value; }. Is it fine as-is or is there a better method? –  Chris Pratt Dec 12 '13 at 22:15
    
I am not sure about the setter, I don't need it. My dbcontexts are expressed in concrete-class language, while repositories are built around interfaces. Repositories allow LINQ expressions to be stated with interface language (and getters are enough for this) while inserts are implemented at the repository level (which operates on concrete types/properties). –  Wiktor Zychla Dec 12 '13 at 22:17
    
I would write the setter with a dynamic cast check and an exception when the value cast fails. –  Wiktor Zychla Dec 12 '13 at 22:25

I use a generic interface adapter like this

public class InterfaceCollectionAdapter<TConcrete, TInterface> : ICollection<TInterface> where TConcrete : TInterface
{
    private Func<ICollection<TConcrete>> _gettor;
    private Action<ICollection<TConcrete>> _settor;
    private Func<ICollection<TConcrete>> _factory;

    private ICollection<TConcrete> Wrapped
    {
        get
        {
            var value = _gettor();

            if (value == null && _settor != null)
            {
                value = (_factory != null)
                    ? _factory()
                    : new List<TConcrete>();

                _settor(value);
            }

            return value;
        }
    }

    public InterfaceCollectionAdapter(Func<ICollection<TConcrete>> gettor, Action<ICollection<TConcrete>> settor = null, Func<ICollection<TConcrete>> factory = null)
    {
        _gettor = gettor;
        _settor = settor;
        _factory = factory;
    }

    public void Add(TInterface item)
    {
        Wrapped.Add((TConcrete)item);
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        Wrapped.Clear();
    }

    public bool Contains(TInterface item)
    {
        return Wrapped.Contains((TConcrete)item);
    }

    public void CopyTo(TInterface[] array, int arrayIndex)
    {
        var wrapped = Wrapped;
        foreach (var item in wrapped)
        {
            array[arrayIndex++] = (TInterface)item;
        }
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { return Wrapped.Count; }
    }

    public bool IsReadOnly
    {
        get { return Wrapped.IsReadOnly; }
    }

    public bool Remove(TInterface item)
    {
        return Wrapped.Remove((TConcrete)item);
    }

    public IEnumerator<TInterface> GetEnumerator()
    {
        var wrapped = Wrapped;
        foreach (var item in wrapped)
            yield return item;
    }

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }
}

Then in the POCO you simply do this

 public Foo()
 {
    public Foo()
    {
        _bars = new InterfaceCollectionAdapter<Bar, IBar>(() => this.Bars, (value) => { this.Bars = value; });
    }

    private InterfaceCollectionAdapter<Bar, IBar> _bars;

    [NotMapped]
    ICollection<IBar> IFoo.Bars
    {
        get
        {
            return _bars;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I have an even "smarter" version that automatically news up the underlying EF-needed virtuals so you don't have the new List<TConcrete>() call in your constructors. Answer updated. See the edit history for the simpler version. –  IDisposable Oct 20 '14 at 21:55

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