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I am trying to make a generic, purely virtual Matrix class that supports methods that return a mew Matrix. Of course, if one of those methods is used on a subclass of Matrix it should return something of the subclass type, instead of a Matrix.

Currently my code is something like this:

class Matrix
{
    virtual auto transposed() const -> decltype (*this) = 0 ;
} ;

class DenseMatrix : Matrix
{
    auto transposed() const -> decltype (*this)
    {
        DenseMatrix res ;
        // Do some magic

        return res ;
    }
} ;

However, since decltype(*this) is of type DenseMatrix& instead of DenseMatrix, the code fails because it ends up returning a reference to a local variable.

How can I tell C++ that I want to return a value instead of a reference? Alternatively, is there any cleaner way of achieving virtual functions returning the type of the class they are being called from?

share|improve this question
5  
You can't have a value of an abstract type, so you can't have a Matrix return value in your abstract base class, it has to be a reference or a (smart) pointer. – David Brown Dec 13 '13 at 0:37
5  
Also you can't override a base class's function with a function that returns a different type unless that type is a pointer or reference and the overridden return type a derived class of the original return type. – David Brown Dec 13 '13 at 0:41

If you want to remove the reference from a type, you could simply use std::remove_reference.

Yet, another general solution to this kind of problem is to use static polymorphism aka CRTP:

struct MatrixBase
{
     // here goes all stuff which is independent of the actual matrix,
     // like number of rows, columns, etc.
};

template<typename Derived>
struct Matrix : public MatrixBase
{
     virtual auto transposed() const -> Derived
     {
           return static_cast<Derived const&>(*this).transposed();
     }
     // ...
};

struct DenseMatrix : public Matrix<DenseMatrix>
{
     virtual auto transposed() const override -> DenseMatrix
     { /* implementation */ }
     // ...
};

Such a strategy is usually a bit faster than using dynamic polymorphism vis base class pointers. CRTP is used, for instance, also by the library Eigen.

share|improve this answer

The following is off the cuff, and not fully tested. However I find myself wondering if the well known handle/body idiom might be a good match for your requirements here. It works by making Matrix nothing but a pointer to an implementation (what you currently call Matrix). And then derived clients derive from the implementation, not from Matrix itself.

Here's a small sketch:

#include <memory>

class Matrix
{
public:
    class Imp
    {
    public:
        virtual ~Imp() = default;
        virtual auto transposed() const -> std::unique_ptr<Imp> = 0;
    };

private:
    std::unique_ptr<Imp> data_;
public:
    Matrix() = default;

    explicit Matrix(std::unique_ptr<Imp> data)
        : data_(std::move(data)) {}

    auto transposed() const -> Matrix
    {
        return Matrix(data_ ? data_->transposed() : nullptr);
    }
};

class DenseMatrix
    : public Matrix::Imp
{
public:
    virtual auto transposed() const -> std::unique_ptr<Imp>
    {
        std::unique_ptr<DenseMatrix> res(new DenseMatrix);
        // Do some magic
        return std::move(res);
    }
};

It means all of your data must be on the heap. But that is probably going to happen anyway in a situation like this.

External clients just deal with Matrix, which is not a base class, but a "handle" to a pointer to the base class. New implementations derive from the internal base class instead of from the Matrix class itself.

It doesn't work all of the time. And I've glossed over details like how the client is going to specify he wants (e.g.) DenseMatrix as opposed to some other type of Matrix. But this general data structure can sometimes be quite useful.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, this is an extremely complicated solution to an apparently simple problem. I guess it's a symptom that my approach to it is wrong. I could also make Matrix a nonpure virtual function, and make transposed() return a decltype(remove_reference<*this>), but it's just a different ugly solution. – Martín Fixman Dec 13 '13 at 5:09

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