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I am using a dict object to hold instance values in a class. I like having the dict because I often want to set or get a bunch of values at the same time and it is easy to pass a list or dict to accomplish this. For example to get several of the instance values I can just pass a [list of keys] and get back a {dict of those keys: values}. As far as I can tell, doing that with separate attributes for each key requires jumping through a lot of code hoops if it is possible at all.

Anyway, I'm looking for something like this:

class SomeClass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._desc = {
            'hair': 'brown'
            'eyes': 'blue'
            'height': 1.55
        }

This is all pretty simple up to here, but some of the values require special "set" conditions. My first attempt was something like this:

class SomeClass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._haircolor = 'blonde'
        self._eyecolor = 'green'
        self._desc = {
            'haircolor': self.haircolor
            'eyecolor': self.eyecolor
            'height': 1.55
        }

    @property
    self.haircolor(self):
        return self._haircolor

    @haircolor.setter
    self.haircolor(self, color):
        if color.lower() in ['blonde', 'brunette', 'brown', 'black', 'auburn', 'red']:
            self._haircolor = color
        else: raise ValueError()

    # Same type of property construct for eyecolor

This did not work. self._desc['haircolor'] would initialize to 'blonde', but it had no dynamic tie to the property construct or the self._haircolor attribute. I tried replacing this with

class SomeClass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._haircolor = 'blonde'
        self._eyecolor = 'green'
        self._desc = {
            'haircolor': property(self.get_haircolor, self.set_haircolor)
            'eyecolor': property(self.get_eyecolor, self.set_eyecolor)
            'height': 1.55
        }

    self.get_haircolor(self):
        return self._haircolor

    self.set_haircolor(self, color):
        if color.lower() in ['blonde', 'brunette', 'brown', 'black', 'auburn', 'red']:
            self._haircolor = color
        else: raise ValueError()

But this failed in a different way.

print self._desc['haircolor'] 

Would return a str for the property object, and

self._desc['haircolor'] = 'brunette'

destroyed the property object and replaced it with the string.

I researched a few similar questions, like this one and this one.

Both of those cases operate at the dictionary level however. The problem there is that I need to know a lot about the dict when I am defining the custom dict class because I need to anticipate key names and switch them in setitem (first example) or the dict-level property object (second example). Ideally I would like to associate the setter with the value object itself so the dict does not need to be aware that there is something special about the values a key can reference.

share|improve this question
    
Have a look at norman. It should do what you want, and allows field level validation. –  aquavitae Dec 13 '13 at 7:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Python objects already store attributes in a dict so what is the point of using yet another dict here ? Just store your attributes the usual way (using properties where it makes sense), and build the desc dict dynamically when you need it.

class SomeClass(object):

    HAIRCOLORS = set(['blonde', 'brunette', 'brown', 'black', 'auburn', 'red'])
    EYECOLORS = set(['green', 'blue', 'brown', 'gray'])

    def __init__(self, haircolor="blond", eyecolor="green"):
        self.haircolor = haircolor
        self.eyecolor = eyecolor
        self.height = 1.55 # you didn't mention any validation here

    @property
    self.haircolor(self):
        return self._haircolor

    @haircolor.setter
    self.haircolor(self, color):
        color = color.lower()
        if color not in self.HAICOLORS:
            raise ValueError("'%s' is not a valid hair color" % color)
        self._haircolor = color

    # same thing for eyecolor

    @property
    def desc(self):
        return dict(
           haircolor=self.haircolor, 
           eyecolor=self.eyecolor, 
           height=self.height)

If this is a reccuring pattern you can eventually write your own descriptor:

class ChoiceDescriptor(object):
    def __init__(self, key, choices):
        self.key = key
        self.storage = "_%s" % key
        self.choices = set(choices)

    def __get__(self, instance, cls=None):
        if instance is None:
            return self
        return getattr(instance, self.storage)


    def __set__(self, instance, value):
        value = value.lower()
        if value not in self.choices:
            raise ValueError(
                "'%s' is not a valid value for '%s'" % (value, self.key))
        setattr(instance, self.storage, value)


class SomeClass(object):
    haircolor = ChoiceDescriptor("haircolor", 
        ['blonde', 'brunette', 'brown', 'black', 'auburn', 'red'])
    eyecolor = ChoiceDescriptor("eyecolor", 
        ['green', 'blue', 'brown', 'gray'])
share|improve this answer
    
+1 since this led me to an interim solution. The insight you offered was to apply @property to at the dict level. In pseudocode the implementation was for each key, try to getattr(self, "_g/set_" + key), except AttributeError set the value using normal dict assignment. This allows me to start with simple assignments and add accessors arbitrarily later without touching the dictionary or API objects. Ideally I would still like to just assign the property-like object to the dict, but this looks the same to the user, and just requires a little naming discipline in my private methods. –  Roga Dec 13 '13 at 23:37
    
You can't "assign properties" to a dict - well you can but it won't work as you expect. Now instead of asking how to implement what you think is the solution you could explain what is your real problem as there might be better solutions... –  bruno desthuilliers Dec 14 '13 at 9:33

If you use self._desc['haircolor'] to get/set its value, it will invoke the __getitem__()/__setitem__() method of the dict no matter whether the value is a descriptor or not.

If you want to visit a descriptor, the way to visit it is to use something like this instance.descrip because at this time it will invoke __getattribute__() method and if descrip is a descriptor, it will use the corresponding setter and getter methods, otherwise it will treat it a normal attribute. Here's a doc about descriptor

You just want to control how a key is called in a dict? You may refer to this question Python: How to “perfectly” override a dict to override the __getitem__() and __setitem__() method in a dict-like class. This is not complex and all you should do is to create a class like that and then use it as if it's a dict type variable.
After that, use the new dict-like class to generate self._desc variable and getting or setting something like self._desc['haircolor'] will do as you desire.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not against overriding getitem, but I'm not sure how that will accomplish my goal. I could see something like this working: –  Roga Dec 13 '13 at 17:16

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