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What is wrong with following BackgroundWorker ? If i try to set some breakpoints..the value of bw_ProgressChanged is updated, but If i'm running all, my WPF is "Freeze"

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        bw.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
        bw.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
    }
    private readonly BackgroundWorker bw = new BackgroundWorker();
    private void btnStart_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (!bw.IsBusy)
        {
            bw.DoWork += bw_DoWork;
            bw.RunWorkerCompleted += bw_RunWorkerCompleted;
            bw.ProgressChanged += bw_ProgressChanged;
            bw.RunWorkerAsync();
        }
    }
    private void bw_ProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        this.lblProgress.Content= e.ProgressPercentage.ToString()+ "%";
        this.pb.Value = e.ProgressPercentage;
    }

    private void bw_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.Cancelled)
            lblProgress.Content = "Cancel !";

        else if (e.Error!=null)
            lblProgress.Content= "Error: " + e.Error.Message;

        else
            lblProgress.Content = "Finish !";
    }

    private void bw_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        BackgroundWorker bw = sender as BackgroundWorker;
        StreamReader sr = new StreamReader("C:\\File 1.txt");
        StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter("C:\\Out-File 1.txt");

            var fi = new FileInfo("C:\\File 1.txt");
            long total = (char)fi.Length;
            int  i = 0;
            string result;
            while (!sr.EndOfStream)
            {
                if (!bw.CancellationPending)
                {
                    result = sr.ReadLine();
                    sw.WriteLine(result);
                    i = i + (char)result.Length;
                    bw.ReportProgress((int)((decimal)i / (decimal)total * (decimal)100));
                }
                else
                {e.Cancel = true; break;}
            } sw.Close(); sr.Close();
    }

    private void btnCancel_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (bw.WorkerSupportsCancellation)
            bw.CancelAsync();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Is it really necessary to update the displayed percentage even if it's the same as previously? –  Marton Dec 13 '13 at 7:36
    
So are you saying you never get any user interface updates? If you put a breakpoint on the first line in bw_ProgressChanged, does it ever trigger? –  Nilzor Dec 13 '13 at 7:52
    
Yes i know the value will be remain the same for several loops... –  job Dec 13 '13 at 7:53
    
@Nilzor yes it' is triggered, i have put a breakpoint at bw_ProgressChanged, but WPF is "freeze"..cannot move with mouse... –  job Dec 13 '13 at 7:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I know that it isn't really the answer on the question about background worker but maybe it's time to use "new" C# 5.0 feauture called async/await? I made some modifications in your code and tested it and all works without errors and freezes:

    private bool cancelled;

    private bool started;

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private async void btnStart_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (started) return;
        cancelled = false;
        started = true;
        try
        {
            await DoAsync();
        }
        catch (Exception exception)
        {
            lblProgress.Content = "Error: " + exception.Message;
            return;
        }
        finally
        {
            started = false;
        }
        lblProgress.Content = cancelled ? "Cancel !" : "Finish !";
    }

    private async Task DoAsync()
    {
        using (var sr = new StreamReader("C:\\File 1.txt"))
        {
            using (var sw = new StreamWriter("C:\\Out-File 1.txt"))
            {
                var fi = new FileInfo("C:\\File 1.txt");
                long total = (char) fi.Length;
                int i = 0;
                string result;
                while (!sr.EndOfStream)
                {
                    result = await sr.ReadLineAsync();
                    await sw.WriteLineAsync(result);
                    i = i + (char) result.Length;
                    ProgressChanged((int) ((decimal) i/(decimal) total*(decimal) 100));
                    if (cancelled) return;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    private void ProgressChanged(int progress)
    {
        this.lblProgress.Content = progress.ToString() + "%";
        this.pb.Value = progress;
    }

    private void btnCancel_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        cancelled = true;
    }

Also my advice about percent calculation is to check if it's changed in each iteration and then rise interface updates.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a fine answer, but there are some scenarios where using .NET 4.5 (and thus C# 5) is not an option. –  Marton Dec 13 '13 at 10:20
    
@Marton What about Microsoft.Bcl.Async nuget package? –  Deffiss Dec 13 '13 at 10:57
    
I usually try to avoid installing anything extra to solve an issue which is clearly fixable by just changing something small in my code. –  Marton Dec 13 '13 at 11:01

The problem is that the work part of your background worker (i.e. read a line from a file and write the line to another file) is a very brief operation and after this very brief operation you update the user interface.

This means that you are updating the user interface very frequently and the user interface thread is very busy doing these updates. It therefore doesn't get a chance to do the other things you would like to do.

If you limit the number of updates to 100 you should find the the user interface doesn't lock up.

BackgroundWorker bw = sender as BackgroundWorker;
StreamReader sr = new StreamReader("C:\\File 1.txt");
StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter("C:\\Out-File 1.txt");

var fi = new FileInfo("C:\\File 1.txt");
long total = (char)fi.Length;
int  i = 0;
string result;
long updateIncrement = total / 100;
long nextUpdate = 0;
while (!sr.EndOfStream)
{
    if (!bw.CancellationPending)
    {
        result = sr.ReadLine();
        sw.WriteLine(result);
        i = i + (char)result.Length;
        if ( i > nextUpdate )
        {
            nextUpdate += updateIncrement;
            bw.ReportProgress((int)((decimal)i / (decimal)total * (decimal)100));
        }
    }
    else
    {
        e.Cancel = true; 
        break;
    }
} 
sw.Close(); 
sr.Close();

BTW, why are you casting the file length to a char and then assigning it to a long? You will have problems if the file size is greater than 0xFFFF.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for answering the question :) –  groverboy Dec 13 '13 at 10:50

I'm guessing you're experiencing a NullReferenceException in the worker thread because you're not checking for result != null, which will happen when you reach end of stream.

edit: I might be wrong here - I don't know if sr.EndOfStream will be true after you've read the last line or not. Also, runWorkerCompleted should execute even if you're experiencing an exception. That said, you may be leaking the streams here; You should wrap the stream reading in using blocks.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't get any exception, just a "freeze" WPF. –  job Dec 13 '13 at 7:49
    
I have tried with using as well, but no difference.. –  job Dec 13 '13 at 7:51

Freezes in the user interface are usually caused by the GUI thread being busy. Why it is busy I cannot tell from the code. Maybe you have some other UI code that triggers somewhere in the middle of the process, which loops and never exits. This would result in either the progress update and/or the RunWorkerCompleted-methods never to execute (freeze).

I would also start with finding out when it freezes. Maybe that can give you some clues. Insert Debug.WriteLine-lines before and after progress reporting and before and after file opening and closing. See what the debug output looks like then. Contrary to UI updates, Debug-writes can be triggered from any thread, so that makes it good for debugging threading issues.

share|improve this answer
    
it's interesting, i just put Debug.WriteLine(total); just after i = i + (char)result.Length;, and WPF is working...but it's not running correctly, progressbar is running from none to full but the label keep running above 100% until thousands %. and because it's too long, when i stop debugging from VS., the output file still not completed... –  job Dec 13 '13 at 8:17

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