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Let's say I have a table:

Current table:

title_id        title_name               title_qty
   1       A.I. Artificial Intelligence      2
   2       Batman Begins                    40
   3       2012                              7
   4       101 Dalmatians                   23
   5       Act of Valor                      1
   6       Batman                           50
   7       20 Million Miles to Earth       340

I would like to have an output of:

Desired output:

   title_id        title_name               title_qty  title_char
       4          101 Dalmatians                23          #
       7          20 Million Miles to Earth     340         #
       3                2012                    7           #
       1          A.I. Artificial Intelligence  2           A
       5          Act of Valor                  1           A
       6          Batman                        50          B
       2          Batman Begins                 40          B

Based on what I read here in Stack Overflow, the fastest way to check if a character is a number is to use LIKE '[0-9]%' so I came up with

Query:

SELECT *, CASE WHEN LEFT(title_name,1) LIKE '[0-9]%' THEN "#" ELSE LEFT(title_name,1) END as title_char FROM title ORDER BY title_name

Output:

title_id        title_name               title_qty  title_char
   4          101 Dalmatians                23          1
   7          20 Million Miles to Earth     340         2
   3                2012                    7           2
   1          A.I. Artificial Intelligence  2           A
   5          Act of Valor                  1           A
   6          Batman                        50          B
   2          Batman Begins                 40          B

As shown above, it doesn't work at all. But if I change the LIKE to match a single digit, it works:

SELECT *, CASE WHEN LEFT(title_name,1) LIKE '1%' THEN "#" ELSE LEFT(title_name,1) END as title_char FROM title ORDER BY title_name

title_id        title_name               title_qty  title_char
   4          101 Dalmatians                23          #
   7          20 Million Miles to Earth     340         2
   3                2012                    7           2
   1          A.I. Artificial Intelligence  2           A
   5          Act of Valor                  1           A
   6          Batman                        50          B
   2          Batman Begins                 40          B

I initially thought that it doesn't work because my query is a bit complicated so I did a simple SELECT WHERE. The LIKE is added after the WHERE.

No output (when there should be three):

SELECT * FROM title WHERE title_name LIKE '[0-9]%' ORDER BY title_name 

Working as expected:

SELECT * FROM title WHERE title_name LIKE '1%' ORDER BY title_name 

SELECT * FROM title WHERE title_name LIKE '2%' ORDER BY title_name

According to the SQL documentation,

A character class “[...]” matches any character within the brackets. For example, “[abc]” matches “a”, “b”, or “c”. To name a range of characters, use a dash. “[a-z]” matches any letter, whereas “[0-9]” matches any digit.

Anyone knows why it doesn't work if you used character class [0-9]? As a beginner, please do correct me if I am wrong. But I am curious why it works if I use LIKE '1%' or any digit while LIKE '[0-9]%' won't give any result? Documentation says it should match any digit right? If casting it as integer is a requirement it shouldn't work on all my tests, right? Because I didn't cast it before doing the LIKE comparison.

SQL fiddle: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/492906/7

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1  
I edited the question... Just to add this is the query that can produce the right output, I used RLIKE: SELECT *, CASE WHEN LEFT(title_name,1) RLIKE '[0-9]' THEN "#" ELSE LEFT(title_name,1) END as title_char FROM title ORDER BY title_name –  bimspramirez Dec 13 '13 at 13:11
    
The documentation you quote is about RLIKE, not LIKE, so that seems correct to me. In other SQL dialects, [...] is accepted by LIKE, but (apparently) not in MySQL. –  hvd Dec 13 '13 at 13:30
    
Hi hvd, thanks! –  bimspramirez Dec 16 '13 at 1:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The documentation is a bit confusing. I hope careful snipping can make it clearer:

MySQL provides standard SQL pattern matching as well as a form of pattern matching

[...]

SQL pattern matching enables you to use “_” to match any single character and “%” to match an arbitrary number of characters (including zero characters). In MySQL, SQL patterns are case-insensitive by default. Some examples are shown here. You do not use = or <> when you use SQL patterns; use the LIKE or NOT LIKE comparison operators instead.

[...]

The other type of pattern matching provided by MySQL uses extended regular expressions. When you test for a match for this type of pattern, use the REGEXP and NOT REGEXP operators (or RLIKE and NOT RLIKE, which are synonyms).

[...]

A character class “[...]” matches any character within the brackets. For example, “[abc]” matches “a”, “b”, or “c”. To name a range of characters, use a dash. “[a-z]” matches any letter, whereas “[0-9]” matches any digit.

Since that last sentence is under "the other type of pattern matching", it only applies to the RLIKE that you've already found, not to LIKE.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi thanks hvd! I got confused. Probably because I found a post here in Stack Overflow recommending LIKE[0-9] for checking if a character is a digit so I thought it will work. Thanks, everything is clear now! Sorry SO if my question is so simple and silly, let me know if it should be deleted. Anyhow, thanks again I am learning a lot from here! –  bimspramirez Dec 16 '13 at 2:05
    
Everything's simple and silly once you know why. :) Don't worry about it, it's a perfectly good question. –  hvd Dec 16 '13 at 6:58

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