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How do I recursively list all files under a directory in Java? Does the framework provide any utility?

I saw a lot of hacky implementations. But none from the framework or nio

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possible duplicate of List all files from a directory recursively with Java –  adam Jul 2 '13 at 19:03
5  
@adam "original question" was asked two months later than this one. –  default locale Jul 3 '13 at 4:03

13 Answers 13

up vote 71 down vote accepted

FileUtils have iterateFiles and listFiles methods. Give them a try. (from commons-io)

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20  
FYI/TLDR: if you just want to list all files recursively with no filtering, do FileUtils.listFiles(dir, TrueFileFilter.INSTANCE, TrueFileFilter.INSTANCE), where dir is a File object that points to the base directory. –  andronikus Apr 27 '12 at 17:53
6  
Alternatively and more concisely you can do FileUtils.listFiles(dir, null, true) –  MikeFHay Jun 24 '13 at 14:56
    
You might want to consider using listFilesAndDirs(), as listFiles() does not return empty folders. –  schnatterer Feb 14 at 11:41
    
@MikeFHay Looking at the FileUtils code, I think that vould be FileUtils.listFiles(dir, true, true). using FileUtils.listFiles(dir, null, true) will throw an Exception, while FileUtils.listFiles(dir, true, null) will list all files without looking into subdirectories. –  ocramot May 23 at 9:15

// Ready to run

import java.io.File;

    public class Filewalker {

        public void walk( String path ) {

            File root = new File( path );
            File[] list = root.listFiles();

            if (list == null) return;

            for ( File f : list ) {
                if ( f.isDirectory() ) {
                    walk( f.getAbsolutePath() );
                    System.out.println( "Dir:" + f.getAbsoluteFile() );
                }
                else {
                    System.out.println( "File:" + f.getAbsoluteFile() );
                }
            }
        }

        public static void main(String[] args) {
            Filewalker fw = new Filewalker();
            fw.walk("c:\\" );
        }
    }
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4  
why System.err.println? not .out. ? Just wondered. –  Mustafa Oct 14 '11 at 20:22
    
prettier :$ ... –  devoured elysium Oct 13 '12 at 11:56
    
@Jason The walk method calls itself to traverse all directories. This is commonly known as recursion. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recursion#Recursion_in_computer_science –  stacker Oct 20 '12 at 19:29
1  
put the for inside if(list!=null){ } –  srk Dec 4 '12 at 10:31

Java 7 will have has Files.walkFileTree:

If you provide a starting point and a file visitor, it will invoke various methods on the file visitor as it walks through the file in the file tree. We expect people to use this if they are developing a recursive copy, a recursive move, a recursive delete, or a recursive operation that sets permissions or performs another operation on each of the files.

There is now an entire Oracle tutorial on this question.

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1  
You can get the current snapshot of Java7 and try it out: java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/essential/io/walk.html –  helpermethod Jan 13 '10 at 12:33

I would go with something like:

public void list(File file) {
    System.out.println(file.getName());
    File[] children = file.listFiles();
    for (File child : children) {
        list(child);
    }
}

The System.out.println is just there to indicate to do something with the file. there is no need to differentiate between files and directories, since a normal file will simply have zero children.

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5  
From the documentation of listFiles(): “If this abstract pathname does not denote a directory, then this method returns null.” –  hfs Nov 17 '11 at 9:30
    
Improved variant public static Collection<File> listFileTree(File dir) { if (null == dir || !dir.isDirectory()) { return Collections.emptyList(); } final Set<File> fileTree = new HashSet<File>(); for (File entry : dir.listFiles()) { if (entry.isFile()) { fileTree.add(entry); } else { fileTree.addAll(listFileTree(entry)); } } return fileTree; } –  Ben Nov 22 '13 at 23:30

just write it yourself using simple recursion:

public List<File> addFiles(List<File> files, File dir)
{
    if (files == null)
        files = new LinkedList<File>();

    if (!dir.isDirectory())
    {
        files.add(dir);
        return files;
    }

    for (File file : dir.listFiles())
        addFiles(files, file);
    return files;
}
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Bozho's answer is better though. –  pstanton Jan 13 '10 at 11:39
1  
Please! let the caller initialize the files list so it hasn't have to check its nullity each time. If you want create a second (public) method that creates the list, calls this internal method and returns the complete list. –  helios Jan 13 '10 at 11:44
    
@pstanton: so vote for it! :) –  helios Jan 13 '10 at 11:44
    
whatever. a null check isn't very expensive, convenience + personal preference aside i think he'll get the point. –  pstanton Jan 13 '10 at 11:45
2  
i did vote for it you goose. –  pstanton Jan 13 '10 at 11:46

I prefer using a queue over recursion for this kind of simple traversion:

List<File> allFiles = new ArrayList<File>();
Queue<File> dirs = new LinkedList<File>();
dirs.add(new File("/start/dir/"));
while (!dirs.isEmpty()) {
  for (File f : dirs.poll().listFiles()) {
    if (f.isDirectory()) {
      dirs.add(f);
    } else if (f.isFile()) {
      allFiles.add(f);
    }
  }
}
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But your algorithm cannot print with indented output. Dirs and files are messed. Any solution? –  Wei Feb 1 '13 at 5:54
    
+1 for smart LinkedList usage –  Pascal Jun 28 '13 at 11:36

No external libraries needed.
Returns a Collection so you can do whatever you want with it after the call.

public static Collection<File> listFileTree(File dir) {
    Set<File> fileTree = new HashSet<File>();
    for (File entry : dir.listFiles()) {
        if (entry.isFile()) fileTree.add(entry);
        else fileTree.addAll(listFileTree(entry));
    }
    return fileTree;
}
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I believe this solutions is much more compact, easier to read and smarter. –  Ben Jul 8 at 3:31
    
perfect balance of compactness and readability –  bradvido Jul 24 at 20:10

I think this should do the work:

File dir = new File(dirname);
String[] files = dir.list();

This way you have files and dirs. Now use recursion and do the same for dirs (File class has isDirectory() method).

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Apart from the recursive traversal one can use a Visitor based approach as well.

Below code is uses Visitor based approach for the traversal.It is expected that the input to the program is the root directory to traverse.

public interface Visitor {
    void visit(DirElement d);
    void visit(FileElement f);
}

public abstract class Element {
    protected File rootPath;
    abstract void accept(Visitor v);

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return rootPath.getAbsolutePath();
    }
}

public class FileElement extends Element {
    FileElement(final String path) {
        rootPath = new File(path);
    }

    @Override
    void accept(final Visitor v) {
        v.visit(this);
    }
}

public class DirElement extends Element implements Iterable<Element> {
    private final List<Element> elemList;
    DirElement(final String path) {
        elemList = new ArrayList<Element>();
        rootPath = new File(path);
        for (File f : rootPath.listFiles()) {
            if (f.isDirectory()) {
                elemList.add(new DirElement(f.getAbsolutePath()));
            } else if (f.isFile()) {
                elemList.add(new FileElement(f.getAbsolutePath()));
            }
        }
    }

    @Override
    void accept(final Visitor v) {
        v.visit(this);
    }

    public Iterator<Element> iterator() {
        return elemList.iterator();
    }
}

public class ElementWalker {
    private final String rootDir;
    ElementWalker(final String dir) {
        rootDir = dir;
    }

    private void traverse() {
        Element d = new DirElement(rootDir);
        d.accept(new Walker());
    }

    public static void main(final String[] args) {
        ElementWalker t = new ElementWalker("C:\\temp");
        t.traverse();
    }

    private class Walker implements Visitor {
        public void visit(final DirElement d) {
            System.out.println(d);
            for(Element e:d) {
                e.accept(this);
            }
        }

        public void visit(final FileElement f) {
            System.out.println(f);
        }
    }
}

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Java 8 provides a nice stream to process all files in a tree.

Files.walk(Paths.get(path))
        .filter(Files::isRegularFile)
        .forEach(System.out::println);

This provides a natural way to traverse files. Since it's a stream you can do all nice stream operations on the result such as limit, grouping, mapping, exit early etc.

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This solution is quite clear and simple. There is no explicit recursion. It uses lambdas available in Java 8. One could add a filter() or other stream operators to deal with the Paths as they are encountered.

  ArrayList<Path> result;

  result = new ArrayList<>();

  Files.
     walk(Paths.get(dir)).
     forEach(path -> result.add(path));
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1  
List<Path> result = Files.walk(...).collect(toList()); would be more idiomatic. –  assylias May 24 at 23:35

Non-recursive BFS with a single list (particular example is searching for *.eml files):

    final FileFilter filter = new FileFilter() {
        @Override
        public boolean accept(File file) {
            return file.isDirectory() || file.getName().endsWith(".eml");
        }
    };

    // BFS recursive search
    List<File> queue = new LinkedList<File>();
    queue.addAll(Arrays.asList(dir.listFiles(filter)));

    for (ListIterator<File> itr = queue.listIterator(); itr.hasNext();) {
        File file = itr.next();
        if (file.isDirectory()) {
            itr.remove();
            for (File f: file.listFiles(filter)) itr.add(f);
        }
    }
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Based on stacker answer. Here is a solution working in JSP without any external libraries so you can put it almost anywhere on your server:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<%@ page session="false" %>
<%@ page import="java.util.*" %>
<%@ page import="java.io.*" %>
<%@ page contentType="text/html; charset=UTF-8" %>

<%!
    public List<String> files = new ArrayList<String>();
    /**
        Fills files array with all sub-files.
    */
    public void walk( File root ) {
        File[] list = root.listFiles();

        if (list == null) return;

        for ( File f : list ) {
            if ( f.isDirectory() ) {
                walk( f );
            }
            else {
                files.add(f.getAbsolutePath());
            }
        }
    }
%>
<%
    files.clear();
    File jsp = new File(request.getRealPath(request.getServletPath()));
    File dir = jsp.getParentFile();
    walk(dir);
    String prefixPath = dir.getAbsolutePath() + "/";
%>

Then you just do something like:

    <ul>
        <% for (String file : files) { %>
            <% if (file.matches(".+\\.(apk|ipa|mobileprovision)")) { %>
                <li><%=file.replace(prefixPath, "")%></li>
            <% } %>
        <% } %>
    </ul>
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