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I'm trying to replace IP-Addresses with random numbers in Perl:

while (my $line = <file>){
    $line =~ $regex{'ipadress'};

    my $rand0 = int(rand(256));
    my $rand1 = int(rand(256));
    my $rand2 = int(rand(256));
    my $rand3 = int(rand(256));

    $& = "$rand0.$rand1.$rand2.$rand3\n";`
}

The problem is that in some cases there are multiple IP-Addresses in one line.
How to avoid that they all get the same random numbers?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well for a start $& is read-only and you can't assign to it like that to modify the target string.

I'm also unsure whether the key to your hash is really ipadress (with one d) but I'm sure you can fix it if not.

I would write something like this. The /e modifier on the substitute operator causes the replacement string to be executed to determine what to replace the match with. The join statement generates four byte values from 0 to 255 and joins them with dots to form a random address.

while (my $line = <$fh>) {
  $line =~ s{$regex{ipadress}}{
    join '.', map int(rand(256)), 0..3
  }eg;
  print $line;
}
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1  
And there I was thinking that replace by $& assignment was some new feature I've missed. ;-) –  Qtax Dec 13 '13 at 9:57
    
@Qtax: Nope I'm afraid not. The warnings about using $& at all still stand. You can use substr as an lvalue though, and assigning to $& would be the same as assigning to substr($line, $-[0], $+[0]-$-[0]). –  Borodin Dec 13 '13 at 10:00

This might be helpful:

sub rip { return join(".", map { int(rand(256)) } (1..4) ) } 

open my $f, '<', 'input' or die($!);
while (my $line = <$f>){
    $line =~ s/$regex{'ipadress'}/rip()/eg;
}
close($f);
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you have to call "perl -i" to be able to edit inline, don't you? –  hcrudolph Dec 15 '13 at 0:06

These answers are good ways to ensure that new random numbers are picked for each IP address. But the poster's main question is, "How to avoid that they all get the same random numbers?" and it's unclear to me whether they meant "get four random numbers for each IP address in the line" or "guarantee that no two randomly-chosen IP addresses are the same."

In case it's the latter: the probability of getting the same results from four calls of rand(256) twice in a row is one in 232, which seems hardly worth worrying about, but if you are required to guarantee that they're different, you can keep a hash of addresses you've already picked, and update it each time you generate a new address. Stealing from @perreal's solution:

sub rip {
    my $picked_addrs = shift;
    my $new_addr;
    do {
        $new_addr = join(".", map { int(rand(256)) } (1..4) );
    } while defined($picked_addrs->{$new_addr});
    $picked_addrs->{$new_addr} = 1;
    return $new_addr;
} 

open my $f, '<', 'input' or die($!);
while (my $line = <$f>){
    my %picked_addrs;
    $line =~ s/$regex{'ipadress'}/rip(\%picked_addrs)/eg;
}
close($f);

If you want to make sure that you never pick the same address twice anywhere in the file, just declare %picked_addrs outside the while loop, so it doesn't get reset for each line:

open my $f, '<', 'input' or die($!);
my %picked_addrs;
while (my $line = <$f>){
    $line =~ s/$regex{'ipadress'}/rip(\%picked_addrs)/eg;
}
close($f);
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