Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

There is a section of the book I am using to learn c++ which teaches about optimizing functions.

The code is as follows:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int computeFactorials(int, int);

int factorial(int);

int main() {
    computeFactorials(1, 5);
    return 0;
}

int computeFactorials(int num, int max) {
    cout << "Factorial of " << num << ": ";
    cout << factorial(num) << endl;
    num++;
    if(num > max)
        return 0;
    else
        computeFactorials(num, max);
}

int factorial(int n) {
    int result;
    if (n == 1)
         result = 1;
    else
         result = (factorial(n-1) * n);
    return result;
}

Here is the program execution:

Factorial of 10: 3628800

C:\MyPrograms\c++ optimize.cpp -o optimize.exe

C:\MyPrograms>optimize
Factorial of 1: 1
Factorial of 2: 2
Factorial of 3: 6
Factorial of 4: 24
Factorial of 5: 120

I can follow up to num == 3, but when it gets to 4 my logic doesn't add up with the results. I am reading the code like this:

computeFactorials(1,5), 1 meaning the number to start at, and 5 meaning the maximum number of loops. I'm going to start at 3 per se because I understand 1 and 2 as num.

"Factorial of " (3) : factorial(3), then in the factorial function 3 is subtracted by 1 equaling 2, and then multiplied by 3 for a result of 6.

However, when the program gets to num equaling 4 this doesn't seem to make any sense anymore. Because the int result of the factorials() functions should equal 12 not 24.

else result = (factorials (4-1) * 4) ; 

3 * 4 = 12, not 24. How is this program getting to 24 and not 12? Then once again doing the same thing on num = 5, getting 120 rather than 20.

Please help me understand, I am still very nooby in this language, thank you. :)

share|improve this question
2  
To understand recursion, you first have to understand recursion ;-) –  Roger Rowland Dec 13 '13 at 10:24
1  
The text in them is not illegible, if you open the image in a new tab you can see it, your comments are a waste of space, thank you. –  Bryan Fajardo Dec 13 '13 at 10:26
2  
factorial(3)*4 = factorial(2)*3*4 = factorial(1)*2*3*4 = 1*2*3*4=24, isn't it? –  David Dec 13 '13 at 10:26
1  
I think you have not clear idea about what factorial is: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factorial –  Giacomo Degli Esposti Dec 13 '13 at 10:28
1  
It's recursion, so unrolling n = 4 for example would essentially give you ((((4-1-1-1) * (4-1-1)) * (4-1)) * 4). Or 1 * 2 * 3 * 4. –  splrs Dec 13 '13 at 10:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

then in the factorial function 3 is subtracted by 1 equaling 2, and then multiplied by 3 for a result of 6

No.

In the factorial function, 3 "is subtracted by 1" equalling 2, then this 2 is passed to factorial in a recursive call:

  • factorial(2) * 3
  • = factorial(1) * 2 * 3
  • = 1 * 2 * 3
  • = 6

The result of this call is what is multiplied by 3 for a result of 6.

It's (factorial(n-1) * n), not ((n-1) * n).


However, when the program gets to num equaling 4 this doesn't seem to make any sense anymore, because the int result of the factorials() functions should equal 12 not 24.

If factorial(3) is 6, then factorial(4) clearly cannot be only 12 because that's only twice 6. It's not grown enough.

  • factorial(3) * 4
  • = factorial(2) * 3 * 4
  • = factorial(1) * 2 * 3 * 4
  • = 1 * 2 * 3 * 4
  • = 24

3 * 4 = 12, not 24

Correct, but that is not 4 factorial. 4 factorial is 1 * 2 * 3 * 4.

I suspect you're sort of half-confusing factorial with the fibonacci sequence.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you once again Lightness, I'm gonna have to focus on clearly understanding factorials before finishing up this segment. :) –  Bryan Fajardo Dec 13 '13 at 10:33
1  
Oh it's you! :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 13 '13 at 10:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.