Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to achieve smooth shading of triangles in my graphics program, however I'm currently stuck on how to do it exactly, I've got two options.

Option 1: (per vector)

  1. Create a "zero" Vector.
  2. Add the non-normalized normal of every incident triangle to the created vector.
  3. Scale the resulting vector by 1 / incidentTriangleCount.
  4. Return the normalized version of the resulting vector.

Option 2: (per vector)

  1. Create a "zero" Vector.
  2. Add the normalized normal of every incident triangle to the created vector.
  3. Scale the resulting vector by 1 / incidentTriangleCount.
  4. Return the non-normalized version of the resulting vector.

Both approaches are giving me different results and I don't really know which one to take, can anyone give me advice on this?

share|improve this question
    
If you can assign normals only to triangles (not vertices), than you cant do smooth shading. –  athabaska Dec 13 '13 at 11:59
    
@athabaska I currently have for every triangle (face) one normal. And per vertex I want to take the average of all triangles (faces) incident to that vertex, isn't that what I need to do? –  skiwi Dec 13 '13 at 12:01
    
Oh, thats how it's done, yes. –  athabaska Dec 13 '13 at 12:04

1 Answer 1

Always work with normalized normals. Thus your two options will merge in single one :)

Besides, you have to be careful when using "every" incident triangle, because in this case you will have your entire model smoothed, which is not good. E.g. a model of pencil that actually have edges will look like a rounded one. Implement a treshold, i.e. only consider triangles, which normals have relatively small angle beetween them.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.