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It seems that Groovy does not support break and continue from within a closure. What is the best way to simulate this?

revs.eachLine { line -> 
    if (line ==~ /-{28}/) {
            // continue to next line...
    }

}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 45 down vote accepted

You can only support continue cleanly, not break. Especially with stuff like eachLine and each. The inability to support break has to do with how those methods are evaluated, there is no consideration taken for not finishing the loop that can be communicated to the method. Here's how to support continue --

Best approach (assuming you don't need the resulting value).

revs.eachLine { line -> 
    if (line ==~ /-{28}/) {
        return // returns from the closure
    }
}

If your sample really is that simple, this is good for readability.

revs.eachLine { line -> 
    if (!(line ==~ /-{28}/)) {
        // do what you would normally do
    }
}

another option, simulates what a continue would normally do at a bytecode level.

revs.eachLine { line -> 
    while (true) {
        if (line ==~ /-{28}/) {
            break
        }
        // rest of normal code
        break
    }

}

One possible way to support break is via exceptions:

try {
    revs.eachLine { line -> 
        if (line ==~ /-{28}/) {
            throw new Exception("Break")
        }
    }
} catch (Exception e) { } // just drop the exception

You may want to use a custom exception type to avoid masking other real exceptions, especially if you have other processing going on in that class that could throw real exceptions, like NumberFormatExceptions or IOExceptions.

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17  
Using exceptions to control program flow is a bad idea. Creating exceptions requires taking a snapshot of the call stack, and that's costly. –  John Flinchbaugh Oct 16 '08 at 12:17
3  
Not if you override the method that generates the call stack in the exception you throw to do nothing. That's the advantage of a custom exception. –  shemnon Oct 17 '08 at 14:03
6  
That's also an extra step in an effort to work around a problem you wouldn't have if you used a closure like a closure instead of considering it a loop construct. The above example would benefit more from fixing the unclear overall intent of the logic to either filter lines or find a line. –  Cliff Nov 5 '08 at 15:45

Closures cannot break or continue because they are not loop/iteration constructs. Instead they are tools used to process/interpret/handle iterative logic. You can ignore given iterations by simply returning from the closure without processing as in:

revs.eachLine { line -> 
    if (line ==~ /-{28}/) {
            return
    }

}

Break support does not happen at the closure level but instead is implied by the semantics of the method call accepted the closure. In short that means instead of calling "each" on something like a collection which is intended to process the entire collection you should call find which will process until a certain condition is met. Most (all?) times you feel the need to break from a closure what you really want to do is find a specific condition during your iteration which makes the find method match not only your logical needs but also your intention. Sadly some of the API lack support for a find method... File for example. It's possible that all the time spent arguing wether the language should include break/continue could have been well spent adding the find method to these neglected areas. Something like firstDirMatching(Closure c) or findLineMatching(Closure c) would go a long way and answer 99+% of the "why can't I break from...?" questions that pop up in the mailing lists. That said, it is trivial to add these methods yourself via MetaClass or Categories.

class FileSupport {
   public static String findLineMatching(File f, Closure c) {
      f.withInputStream {
         def r = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(it))
         for(def l = r.readLine(); null!=l; l = r.readLine())
             if(c.call(l)) return l
         return null
      }
   }
}

using(FileSupport) { new File("/home/me/some.txt").findLineMatching { line ==~ /-{28}/ }

Other hacks involving exceptions and other magic may work but introduce extra overhead in some situations and convolute the readability in others. The true answer is to look at your code and ask if you are truly iterating or searching instead.

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If you pre-create a static Exception object in Java and then throw the (static) exception from inside a closure, the run-time cost is minimal. The real cost is incurred in creating the exception, not in throwing it. According to Martin Odersky (inventor of Scala), many JVMs can actually optimize throw instructions to single jumps.

This can be used to simulate a break:

final static BREAK = new Exception();
//...
try {
  ... { throw BREAK; }
} catch (Exception ex) { /* ignored */ }
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1  
That ... that is a really nifty idea. Combine this with enums to build one pre-created exception for each enum. Heck - put a method in the enum that throws it. Condition.BAD_WEATHER.fire(); –  paulmurray Aug 13 '10 at 2:53
1  
Actually, the idea was not mine. Martin Odersky (the inventor of Scala) showed it as a solution to the same problem in Scala in a talk he gave. I had a professor in a data structures course at Rensselaer many years ago show a solution to a problem that used no goto statements and then the same solution using gotos. The latter was much shorter. His point was that sometimes practicality wins over elegance. –  Ralph Apr 8 '11 at 10:59

In this case, you should probably think of the find() method. It stops after the first time the closure passed to it return true.

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Use return to continue and any closure to break.

Example

File content:

1
2
----------------------------
3
4
5

Groovy code:

new FileReader('myfile.txt').any { line ->
    if (line =~ /-+/)
        return // continue

    println line

    if (line == "3")
        true // break
}

Output:

1
2
3
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